Bachelor of Arts (Hons)in Visual Arts — Concentrations

VART 2115 Drawing: Visual Thinking and Observation

Course code: VART 2115
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Drawing is the fundamental training for various visual arts subjects. It is a discipline that includes strategies for representing forms, movement and ideas through the mark-making medium. It is also a way to convey thoughts and believes through hand and mind coordination. While transforming the experience into drawing, students will obtain new interpretations of visual expressions, as the course focuses on strengthening students’ visual perception and observation with the practice of traditional and contemporary drawing approaches.

This course aims to introduce drawing studies from formal and representational into unconventional image expression, and will advance all beginners to go from fundamental to more exploration level. The course consists of three parts: the practice of drawing fundamentals; the learning of basic visual languages in drawing; and the re-interpretation of drawing from the figurative, representational to the application of various media and alternative processes. There will be exercises on basic training through a series of assignments that stress on using drawing as a medium for visual thinking and observation. Students will draw from direct observation or imagination of still life, landscape, and the human figure. Drawing media may include graphite, charcoal, ink, and collage, as well as watercolour and pastel.

Drawing is the fundamental training for various visual arts subjects. It is a discipline that includes strategies for representing forms, movement and ideas through the mark-making medium. It is also a way to convey thoughts and believes through hand and mind coordination. While transforming the experience into drawing, students will obtain new interpretations of visual expressions, as the course focuses on strengthening students’ visual perception and observation with the practice of traditional and contemporary drawing approaches.

This course aims to introduce drawing studies from formal and representational into unconventional image expression, and will advance all beginners to go from fundamental to more exploration level. The course consists of three parts: the practice of drawing fundamentals; the learning of basic visual languages in drawing; and the re-interpretation of drawing from the figurative, representational to the application of various media and alternative processes. There will be exercises on basic training through a series of assignments that stress on using drawing as a medium for visual thinking and observation. Students will draw from direct observation or imagination of still life, landscape, and the human figure. Drawing media may include graphite, charcoal, ink, and collage, as well as watercolour and pastel.

VART 2116 Painting: Image and Interpretation

Course code: VART 2116
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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This course aims to introduce students to the full range of materials and processes of painting. It provides opportunities for substantial skill development through extensive studio practice of different genres including portrait, landscape, still life and abstraction. The course also consolidates the technical expertise in painting including the understanding of the material quality of paint, the consideration of different painting supports, health and safety issues as well as the efficiency of studio practice.

The course also puts emphasis on examining how ideas and images are represented and explore how they relate to individual expression as well as social interpretation. Students will have opportunity to investigate the fundamental formal languages of painting through different exercises and will gain a solid understanding of the connection between form and content. Studio practice will be supported by lectures and tutorials, which purpose to investigate the debates surrounding the role of contemporary painting. Regular class discussions will also be held to examine the work of art by contemporary painters in terms of their cultural context and stylistic concern. At the end of the course, students will be equipped with preparation skills to discuss in oral and written forms the conceptual and visual elements in their paintings.This course aims to introduce students to the full range of materials and processes of painting. It provides opportunities for substantial skill development through extensive studio practice of different genres including portrait, landscape, still life and abstraction. The course also consolidates the technical expertise in painting including the understanding of the material quality of paint, the consideration of different painting supports, health and safety issues as well as the efficiency of studio practice.

The course also puts emphasis on examining how ideas and images are represented and explore how they relate to individual expression as well as social interpretation. Students will have opportunity to investigate the fundamental formal languages of painting through different exercises and will gain a solid understanding of the connection between form and content. Studio practice will be supported by lectures and tutorials, which purpose to investigate the debates surrounding the role of contemporary painting. Regular class discussions will also be held to examine the work of art by contemporary painters in terms of their cultural context and stylistic concern. At the end of the course, students will be equipped with preparation skills to discuss in oral and written forms the conceptual and visual elements in their paintings.

VART 2125 Visual Literacy in Chinese Painting

Course code: VART 2125
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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This course provides comprehensive and fundamental training on guohua, literally translated as ‘national painting’ or ‘Chinese painting’. It is primarily divided into two sections:

1. Understanding of Xieyi (free style); and
2. Understanding of Gongbi (fine-brush, or delicate style).

Focuses are on the critical concepts and ideas, conventional modes of expression and technical skills of guohua in the ancient models. Students are expected to explore such models for reinterpreting and rejuvenating the traditional form of guohua in the end of the semester.

The rationale to offer this level-2 course is to allow students to understand one of the cores of Chinese arts – Chinese painting. Regarded as Hong Kong residents, art students are supposed to have sufficient art trainings in both Western and Chinese arts. However, Chinese art training has been in deficit in local educational system even after the handover of 1997. Thus this course is to provide relevant art trainings and cognitive knowledge for students to capture the Chinese cultural narratives through practicing Chinese painting.This course provides comprehensive and fundamental training on guohua, literally translated as ‘national painting’ or ‘Chinese painting’. It is primarily divided into two sections:

1. Understanding of Xieyi (free style); and
2. Understanding of Gongbi (fine-brush, or delicate style).

Focuses are on the critical concepts and ideas, conventional modes of expression and technical skills of guohua in the ancient models. Students are expected to explore such models for reinterpreting and rejuvenating the traditional form of guohua in the end of the semester.

The rationale to offer this level-2 course is to allow students to understand one of the cores of Chinese arts – Chinese painting. Regarded as Hong Kong residents, art students are supposed to have sufficient art trainings in both Western and Chinese arts. However, Chinese art training has been in deficit in local educational system even after the handover of 1997. Thus this course is to provide relevant art trainings and cognitive knowledge for students to capture the Chinese cultural narratives through practicing Chinese painting.

VART 2126 Chinese Word as Image: Foundational Studies in Chinese Calligraphy and Seal Engraving

Course code: VART 2126
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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The centrality of using Chinese words as the major element in artistic expressions is a unique and prominent phenomenon in both Chinese and global visual culture from past to present. Chinese words, as evolved from pictographic representation to

non-representational character, is the fundamental medium for artistic expressions in the practices of a range of Chinese art forms including calligraphy, seal engraving and other craft arts. Whether brushed on paper or engraved in three-dimensional objects made of stone, bronze and any other penetrable material, the visual and artistic form of Chinese word interacts with the subtlety of the linguistic aspect of Chinese language to produce a richly interdisciplinary artistic experience.

This course consists of three parts:

1.) The study of foundational knowledge and theories pertinent to the material, tools, and the linguistic skills involved in the practices of Chinese calligraphy and seal engraving;

2.) The practical study of brush, engraving and carving techniques, the compositional strategies of the strokes of Chinese characters and other relevant basic skills; and

3.) A simple hands-on studio art project.

The class will learn the skills of adopting different material, handling of tools and other basic techniques of Chinese calligraphy and seal engraving through demonstrations and guided practice. The course culminates in a small-scale yet rewarding creative project where by students will produce one piece of artwork based on the application of their acquired concepts, tools and skills.

Students need to acquire the foundational tools and skills of this course to nurture their understanding of Chinese cultural heritage. The foundational knowledge and experience offered by this course are intended to cultivate a synergy with all other courses of Chinese and Asian art history, visual culture, Chinese calligraphy, seal engraving, Chinese painting, typography, Chinese language, and some aspects of sculpture.

VART 2135 Looking through the Lens

Course code: VART 2135
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II OR any GDCV courses offered by AVA OR any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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The world and its cultures are external before one looks deeply. As artists and as responsible citizens, ways of focused looking will help us to learn from, and benefit back to our society and the world.

This is a course on fundamental knowledge of lens-based media, including photography and moving image productions. The essential foundations provided in this course are not merely technical craft but ways of inquisitive looking. Looking is attentive and active while seeing is external and passive. Accordingly, supplementary to technical training, this course aims at broadening students' visual perceptions and sharpening their senses responding to the outside world.

Students will explore and experiment how photographers, moving image artists understand, capture and represent actuality. Technical workshops on camera obscura, optical theory, colour correction, framing and composition, camera operation and camera movement will be offered. Field work of self-directed nature for practicing skills of observation is an important part of the course. Class assignments will enhance students' ability to look into details both in aesthetic realm and in cultural contexts.

Students will be working mainly on photography and elementary moving image production that are essential craft for media artists in various fields and in a cross-disciplinary manner. This course serves as a foundation for works of photography and moving image, interactive media with moving and still content and visual narrative. Students will be both technically and intellectually ready to engage in further experimentations of lens-based media creations in advanced courses.The world and its cultures are external before one looks deeply. As artists and as responsible citizens, ways of focused looking will help us to learn from, and benefit back to our society and the world.

This is a course on fundamental knowledge of lens-based media, including photography and moving image productions. The essential foundations provided in this course are not merely technical craft but ways of inquisitive looking. Looking is attentive and active while seeing is external and passive. Accordingly, supplementary to technical training, this course aims at broadening students' visual perceptions and sharpening their senses responding to the outside world.

Students will explore and experiment how photographers, moving image artists understand, capture and represent actuality. Technical workshops on colours, optical theories, camera movements, framing and operations will be offered. Field work for practicing skills of observation is an important part of the course. Class assignments will enhance students' ability to look into details both in aesthetic realm and in cultural contexts.

Students will be working on photography and video production that are essential craft for media artists in various fields and in a cross-disciplinary manner. This course serves as a foundation for works of photography and moving image, interactive media with moving and still content, spatial design, visual narrative, and video installation. Students will be both technically and intellectually ready to engage in further experimentations of lens-based media creations in advanced courses.

VART 2136 Sound: The Basics

Course code: VART 2136
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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This course aims to study sound beyond the common practice of audio as supplementary and secondary to visuals. Students will un-learn sense of sight as their primary sense, and thus re-learn multiple meanings and interpretations of sound and its relations with visuals. Students will learn to use microphones and recorder, and the skills of audio recording and editing techniques. On top of these technical craft, fundamentals of sound design form essential parts of the course. Principles of sound including physics of sound, auditory perception, awareness of acoustic environment and different types of listening practices will also be introduced.

As a foundation course, it aims to raise students’ interests and doubts in rethinking audio-visual relations. By stressing sound as an artistic and expressive medium in its own right, rather than approached as secondary to visuals, students learn to discover immense creative potentials of sound. Hence, students will be both technically and intellectually ready to engage in further experimentations of sonic creations in advanced courses exploring novelty and possibilities of time-based media. Students will work on sonic creations or, sound design for moving image works (of their own or of their fellow classmates). This course also supports students further explore sound in various media such as video art, installation art, hypermedia, interactive media.

This course aims to study sound beyond the common practice of audio as supplementary and secondary to visuals. Students will un-learn sense of sight as their primary sense, and thus re-learn multiple meanings and interpretations of sound and its relations with visuals. Students will learn to use microphones and recorder, and the skills of audio recording and editing techniques. On top of these technical craft, fundamentals of sound design form essential parts of the course. Principles of sound including physics of sound, auditory perception, awareness of acoustic environment and different types of listening practices will also be introduced.

As a foundation course, it aims to raise students’ interests and doubts in rethinking audio-visual relations. By stressing sound as an artistic and expressive medium in its own right, rather than approached as secondary to visuals, students learn to discover immense creative potentials of sound. Hence, students will be both technically and intellectually ready to engage in further experimentations of sonic creations in advanced courses exploring novelty and possibilities of time-based media. Students will work on sonic creations or, sound design for moving image works (of their own or of their fellow classmates). This course also supports students further explore sound in various media such as video art, installation art, hypermedia, interactive media.

VART 2145 Sculpture: Materials & Processes

Course code: VART 2145
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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We live in a built environment. This environment is defined by different structures and objects, and their spatial relationships. In an effort to interpret our environment and to create new places and forms, this course will explore through in and out of class projects how structures and forms are built through an additive process. This course is designed to bring to light different ways of understanding how sculpture has been made, can be made and explore new methods for the continuance of the discipline into a contemporary context. This course not only looks at sculpture as an independent form but sculpture as an expanded discipline that reaches into many realms expanding our perception to three dimensional space and experience.

This course explores the tools and techniques of additive production and the capacities of the wood shop, metal shop and sculpture studio. A series of small projects designed to build students’ skill base in carpentry, metalworking and general structural challenges will be considered and applied. In addition, students are invited to incorporate projects from other AVA courses or their individual studio practice into the course.

We live in a built environment. This environment is defined by different structures and objects, and their spatial relationships. In an effort to interpret our environment and to create new places and forms, this course will explore through in and out of class projects how structures and forms are built through an additive process. This course is designed to bring to light different ways of understanding how sculpture has been made, can be made and explore new methods for the continuance of the discipline into a contemporary context. This course not only looks at sculpture as an independent form but sculpture as an expanded discipline that reaches into many realms expanding our perception to three dimensional space and experience.

This course explores the tools and techniques of additive production and the capacities of the wood shop, metal shop and sculpture studio. A series of small projects designed to build students’ skill base in carpentry, metalworking and general structural challenges will be considered and applied. In addition, students are invited to incorporate projects from other AVA courses or their individual studio practice into the course.

VART 2147 Installation Art

Course code: VART 2147
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Installation has been the most commonly used art form in contemporary visual creation since 1970s. It is a kind of integrated medium of expression which potentially triggers different sense such as sound, light, odour and other intangible sensible elements. The phenomenon of mixed media and interdisciplinary creation in contemporary art making has indicated strong initiatives to explore new creative space and language within an existing framework, and installation art is the most organic experimental area in this realm. Through the practice of installation art, students will utilise various forms of visual expression within space.

This course aims to inspire and enhance students’ abilities in creativity and expression through practice, exploration and research work on various mixed-forms in the concept of space and place. It will focus on exploring the integrated specificity of installation art, which can integrate other medium such as video, imaging, processing, temporary, performance and theatre, and even interactive installation. It will give a general survey on theory, the development and the latest trends of installation art; students will explore how ideas and theories get contextualized, and how space is redefined with concepts of identification and site-specific contextual meanings. Construction workshop will be given to assist their installation production.

VART 2155 Bodyscape

Course code: VART 2155
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART1006

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In most all art forms, the artist is either moving away from the human form or closer to it. This fluctuation defines the need for further exploration of the body’s ability to communicate and produce form that can further define artistic expression.

This course will explore the body as a landscape for appropriation. Students will look at the different techniques involved in using the human form as object and subject of their creative output. Students are to identify the human forms’ innate ability to be abstracted and appropriated for self-expression. Students will explore the body in different mediums and processes from traditional to contemporary. There will be a focus on the connections that can be made between the generation of form, the creative process and the body as a performative object.

In most all art forms, the artist is either moving away from the human form or closer to it. This fluctuation defines the need for further exploration of the body’s ability to communicate and produce form that can further define artistic expression.

This course will explore the body as a landscape for appropriation. Students will look at the different techniques involved in using the human form as object and subject of their creative output. Students are to identify the human forms’ innate ability to be abstracted and appropriated for self-expression. Students will explore the body in different mediums and processes from traditional to contemporary. There will be a focus on the connections that can be made between the generation of form, the creative process and the body as a performative object.

VART 2156 Interactive Art

Course code: VART 2156
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Contemporary artists have been experimenting with the use of technology to enable and orchestrate the participation of the audience. Unfortunately, common studies of interactivity are often focused on the technical implementation rather from the critical and aesthetic viewpoints.
This course introduces the foundation concepts and skills of interactivity employed in contemporary art and design. It aims to go beyond the traditional discussion of interactive media from either the media studies approach or the cognitive aspect of the human computer interaction (HCI) direction. Within the current social and technological context, it provides a broader investigation from the participatory and the performative nature of interaction with the focus of the human body as the main site of interaction.
Students in the course learn to create simple audio-visual musical instruments that the artists and audience can perform together. They also build game-like environments or devices that participants can explore through their bodily interaction. Within this context the focus of the course lies more on the interaction process and experience rather than on the interface design.
This course provides a broad coverage of the use of interactivity in different areas of contemporary art and design. Historical reference will be drawn from a variety of sources such as literature, theatre, information technology, social science, and architecture. The course will teach the use of the simple graphical programming environment Pure Data that the students can use to experiment with interactive media content, without going through a steep learning curve of mastering traditional text based programming.

VART 3105 Further Studies in Studio & Media Arts (Drawing & Painting)

Course code: VART 3105
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: To be specified by the course instructor
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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Studio & Media Arts.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Studio & Media Arts from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Studio & Media Arts at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Studio & Media Arts Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3106 Further Studies in Studio & Media Arts (Chinese Arts)

Course code: VART 3106
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: To be specified by offering instructor
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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Studio & Media Arts.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Studio & Media Arts from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Studio & Media Arts at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Studio & Media Arts Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3107 Further Studies in Studio and Media Arts (Lens-based Media)

Course code: VART 3107
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: To be specified by offering instructor
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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Studio & Media Arts.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Studio & Media Arts from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Studio & Media Arts at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Studio & Media Arts Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3115 Drawing: Inquiry and Experimentation

Course code: VART 3115
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Drawing: Visual Thinking and Observation
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2115

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Drawing is not merely a fundamental tool for all visual artists, but also an artistic medium in its own right: by inquiring into traditional ideas, and through experimental use of drawing media and innovative approaches, Drawing can open entirely new perceptions of reality, beyond the notions commonly connoted with pencil and paper.

This course aims to strengthen and consolidate students’ drawing skills and knowledge acquired from the course of VART 2111 Drawing: Visual Thinking and Observation. It enables students to explore drawing as an evolving mode of contemporary art practice and expression, and considers drawing as a means for contextual inquiry and experimentation with the application of creative ideas, practices and technologies of the discipline. The content deals with the concept of drawing, its development from traditional to contemporary, and covers a wide range of techniques, materials, functions and approaches with alternative process of the media.

Students may work in a variety of traditional media, including graphite, charcoal and pastel, and are encouraged to explore the use of new and mixed media. Various drawing approaches with a variety of subject matters, such as figure, still-life, and landscape will be examined and practiced in the course. Students will also concentrate on more complex personal and creative aspects of drawing, while perceptual and conceptual issues will be pursued. By the end of the course, students will have the competence to transform the contextual inquiry into expressive or experimental drawing.Drawing is not merely a fundamental tool for all visual artists, but also an artistic medium in its own right: by inquiring into traditional ideas, and through experimental use of drawing media and innovative approaches, Drawing can open entirely new perceptions of reality, beyond the notions commonly connoted with pencil and paper.

This course aims to strengthen and consolidate students’ drawing skills and knowledge acquired from the course of VART 2111 Drawing: Visual Thinking and Observation. It enables students to explore drawing as an evolving mode of contemporary art practice and expression, and considers drawing as a means for contextual inquiry and experimentation with the application of creative ideas, practices and technologies of the discipline. The content deals with the concept of drawing, its development from traditional to contemporary, and covers a wide range of techniques, materials, functions and approaches with alternative process of the media.

Students may work in a variety of traditional media, including graphite, charcoal and pastel, and are encouraged to explore the use of new and mixed media. Various drawing approaches with a variety of subject matters, such as figure, still-life, and landscape will be examined and practiced in the course. Students will also concentrate on more complex personal and creative aspects of drawing, while perceptual and conceptual issues will be pursued. By the end of the course, students will have the competence to transform the contextual inquiry into expressive or experimental drawing.

VART 3116 Painting: Expression and Exploration

Course code: VART 3116
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Painting: Image and Interpretation
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2116

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This course aims to develop students’ understanding of paint as an expressive tool and help students to explore their own direction through visual problem solving. Students will be provided with opportunities to experiment with different mediums and processes so as to investigate the unique qualities of painting. The course develops students’ independence and consistent work pattern within the studio. It also fosters students to develop a personal language and aesthetic sensibility with an emphasis on the individual growth through technical as well as conceptual development.

The course also addresses the processes of transformation from ideas and images into visual art with consideration of contemporary ideologies and critical debates. Students will be encouraged to start with traditional approaches to painting in terms of seeing it as a self-sufficient discipline and further develop to experimental approaches towards interdisciplinary. Alongside with given studio exercises, lectures and tutorials will be scheduled for addressing major topics in contemporary painting relating to identity concerns, spiritual issues and political debates, and discussing how these issues are relevant to students own practice. By the end of the course, student will have a set of work completed according to their self-initiated theme, which will be further applied onto their future study of the subject.This course aims to develop students’ understanding of paint as an expressive tool and help students to explore their own direction through visual problem solving. Students will be provided with opportunities to experiment with different mediums and processes so as to investigate the unique qualities of painting. The course develops students’ independence and consistent work pattern within the studio. It also fosters students to develop a personal language and aesthetic sensibility with an emphasis on the individual growth through technical as well as conceptual development.

The course also addresses the processes of transformation from ideas and images into visual art with consideration of contemporary ideologies and critical debates. Students will be encouraged to start with traditional approaches to painting in terms of seeing it as a self-sufficient discipline and further develop to experimental approaches towards interdisciplinary. Alongside with given studio exercises, lectures and tutorials will be scheduled for addressing major topics in contemporary painting relating to identity concerns, spiritual issues and political debates, and discussing how these issues are relevant to students own practice. By the end of the course, student will have a set of work completed according to their self-initiated theme, which will be further applied onto their future study of the subject.

VART 3117 Life Drawing

Course code: VART 3117
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Drawing: Visual Thinking and Observation OR Painting: Image and Interpretation
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2115 OR VART2116

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Pre-Requisite: VART 2115 or VART2116 Drawing: Visual Thinking and Observation OR Painting: Image and Interpretation

The exploration of the various shapes and postures of the human body has been a major subject of human creative production since prehistoric times. Especially since the Accademia degli Incamminati was founded in Bologna in the 16th century the drawing from live human models has become a centre-piece in the education of fine artists in particular, yet also designers benefit from an advanced understanding of the proportions and features of the human body to inform their creations.

Anatomical correctness however is only the initial concern in life drawing, as the artist’s kinaesthetic response to the changing poses of the model, and other compositional choices open a space for deeper and more mature creative reflection on the ‘condition humaine’, i.e. the question of what makes us human.

The setup of VART3117 Life Drawing focuses on this more conceptual aspect of life drawing. It initially briefly introduces students to the specific skills and techniques necessary for working with life models, based on skills, which students are required to have built in previous courses. The course continues by exploring advanced manipulation of pictorial structure, colour and gestural expression, possible re-interpretations of the body/space relation, and the effects of form distortions. These techniques and their variations will serve as starting points when students move on to experiment with complex visual expressions that use representations of the human body as the subject for articulating advanced conceptual ideas.

While VART3117 Life Drawing allows the students to further their skills in various self-selected imaging media, both traditional and new, it is the main intention of the course to establish drawing as a methodology for conceptual artistic creation beyond mere representation of a perceived reality. It requires students to think in complex systems, to critically reflect their own practice, and to re-evaluate the human body as it encompasses and expresses the features of being human.

VART 3125 Convention and Innovation in Chinese Painting

Course code: VART 3125
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Literacy in Chinese Painting
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2125

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As Hong Kong serves as a point of convergence of Chinese and Western cultural narratives, “hybridity” comes to be a primary means for local artists, especially ink artists, to take into their art creation. For better understanding Chinese cultural heritage, the course requires students to explore the conventions embedded in guohua for thousands of years. The aim of such training is to enhance and build up visual literacy in Chinese painting. With the introduction of the concept of “hybridity”, students are expected to reveal the local cultural identity on the basis of the integration of the convention(s) of guohua with Western mode of expression.

This course is divided into two sections:

1. Exploration in conventional Chinese painting; and

2. Innovative creativity with the concept of “hybridity”.

The former section aims at exploring possibilities of guohua (literally translated as national painting) based on the research of the conventional concepts and ideas. Both xieyi (free style) and gongbi (fine-brush, or delicate, style) are the focuses. The provision of the latter section is the concept of “hybridity”, which is regarded as a crucial artistic means for ink artist to revive the ancient art form of guohua and reveal Hong Kong cultural identity. Through adapting, appropriating and revising the mode(s) of expression from Western art, students learn how to reconcile “Chineseness” and “modernism/contemporaneity” to create Chinese painting with a contemporary new look.As Hong Kong serves as a point of convergence of Chinese and Western cultural narratives, “hybridity” comes to be a primary means for local artists, especially ink artists, to take into their art creation. For better understanding Chinese cultural heritage, the course requires students to explore the conventions embedded in guohua for thousands of years. The aim of such training is to enhance and build up visual literacy in Chinese painting. With the introduction of the concept of “hybridity”, students are expected to reveal the local cultural identity on the basis of the integration of the convention(s) of guohua with Western mode of expression.

This course is divided into two sections:

1. Exploration in conventional Chinese painting; and

2. Innovative creativity with the concept of “hybridity”.

The former section aims at exploring possibilities of guohua (literally translated as national painting) based on the research of the conventional concepts and ideas. Both xieyi (free style) and gongbi (fine-brush, or delicate, style) are the focuses. The provision of the latter section is the concept of “hybridity”, which is regarded as a crucial artistic means for ink artist to revive the ancient art form of guohua and reveal Hong Kong cultural identity. Through adapting, appropriating and revising the mode(s) of expression from Western art, students learn how to reconcile “Chineseness” and “modernism/contemporaneity” to create Chinese painting with a contemporary new look.

VART 3126 Chinese Seal Engraving: The Expressive Identity

Course code: VART 3126
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Chinese Word as Image: Foundational Studies in Chinese Calligraphy and Seal Engraving
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2126

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Seal engraving (zhuanke 篆刻) is a highly developed yet much understudied form of Chinese art. Few people have any idea how to appreciate the beauty of a seal’s (yinzhang 印章) imprinted image, let alone grasp the subtlety of these aesthetic objects. More than simply tools used to imprint one’s presence (commonly authorship and ownership) on a painting or work of calligraphy, seals are carefully design works of art that express a variety of cultural and personal values.

This course consists of three parts: study of the theoretical and historical aspects of seal engraving; the practical study of styles and carving techniques; and a hands-on studio art project. Students will be introduced to related topics as social functions of the seal, transformation of seal styles, relationships between the seal and other arts of China, appreciating the seal and its imprint as aesthetic objects, and the seal as a vehicle for expressing self-image and identity.

After a vigorous analysis of styles and compositional types, the class will learn the techniques of seal engraving through demonstrations and guided practice. The course culminates in the creative project where by students will carve their own personal seals that convey through their design of character seals (wenzi yin 文字印) and pictorial seals (tuxian yin 圖像印) an expression of their self-image or identity.

Seal engraving is an integral form of Chinese art and visual culture. The course not only informs students about traditional Chinese culture, but also challenges them to invigorate the national heritage to express their contemporary thoughts and life. Students will develop independent thinking and problem-solving skills and express creativity as part of the process for creating seals. This course is intended to cultivate a synergy with all other courses of Chinese art history, Chinese painting, Chinese calligraphy, typography, jewellery design, and some aspects of sculpture.Seal engraving (zhuanke 篆刻) is a highly developed yet much understudied form of Chinese art. Few people have any idea how to appreciate the beauty of a seal’s (yinzhang 印章) imprinted image, let alone grasp the subtlety of these aesthetic objects. More than simply tools used to imprint one’s presence (commonly authorship and ownership) on a painting or work of calligraphy, seals are carefully design works of art that express a variety of cultural and personal values.

This course consists of three parts: study of the theoretical and historical aspects of seal engraving; the practical study of styles and carving techniques; and a hands-on studio art project. Students will be introduced to related topics as social functions of the seal, transformation of seal styles, relationships between the seal and other arts of China, appreciating the seal and its imprint as aesthetic objects, and the seal as a vehicle for expressing self-image and identity.

After a vigorous analysis of styles and compositional types, the class will learn the techniques of seal engraving through demonstrations and guided practice. The course culminates in the creative project where by students will carve their own personal seals that convey through their design of character seals (wenzi yin 文字印) and pictorial seals (tuxian yin 圖像印) an expression of their self-image or identity.

Seal engraving is an integral form of Chinese art and visual culture. The course not only informs students about traditional Chinese culture, but also challenges them to invigorate the national heritage to express their contemporary thoughts and life. Students will develop independent thinking and problem-solving skills and express creativity as part of the process for creating seals. This course is intended to cultivate a synergy with all other courses of Chinese art history, Chinese painting, Chinese calligraphy, typography, jewellery design, and some aspects of sculpture.

VART 3135 Independent Music Video

Course code: VART 3135
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Looking through the Lens OR Sound: The Basics
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2135 OR VART2136

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Independent music videos have been an exceptionally rich platform for audio-visual experimentations since the 1980’s. Artists work with limited resources and manipulate simple craft to create innovative music/visual relations. Examining various forms and development of independent music videos will therefore definitely broaden students’ mastery of aesthetics and technicality of music/visual productions.

This studio course provides students with knowledge of history, cultural contexts, various styles of independent music video with emphasis on its spirits of DIY, low budget, experimentation and novelty.

The course’s offerings include video camera and lighting workshops, but it also aims at expanding the possibilities of making moving images by including sequences of photographs, illustrations and drawings for music video, which are not necessarily video camera-based. This is achieved by covering essential skills of computer-based moving image composition.

As a course-project course, each student must finish a music video for Hong Kong independent musicians/bands or sound artists by the end of the semester. Hence, production management is also a focus. Students have to deal with allocation of work in a crew, location scouting, scheduling, equipment booking etc. The instructor will introduce students to local independent musicians/sound artists and facilitates communication for the collaborations.

In sum, students acquire experience of the complete procedures of a music video production: choosing music/sound works, knowing the musicians/sound artists, generating initial ideas, presentation of concept and treatment, negotiations and fine-tuning, production (shooting or drawings), moving image compositions, and publishing (in format of professional broadcast HDV, DVD or web-based platforms).

VART 3136 Experiments in Moving Image

Course code: VART 3136
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Looking Through the Lens OR Sound: The Basics
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2135 OR VART 2136

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This course aims at offering students unconventional perspectives on moving image and sound. Notions of creativity and usages of digital moving image and sound gears as artistic tools are highlighted. Hence, the course strongly encourages mixed genres and personal experiments.

Students will learn the art of moving image and sound that inherently stress the significance of experimentation in visual rhetoric, mass media (TV) criticism, and the spirits of boldness in contemporary art making. Students will learn histories, technological/cultural contexts and artistic practices of experimental film/video art.

As an intermediate level course, students will learn digital video production including camera work and the use of supported gears, the craft of three-point lighting and its variations, and also the knowledge of safety and different types of lighting gears. Regarding the idea of sound, it goes beyond the common practice of audio production as supplementary and secondary to visuals. Students will unlearn sense of sight as their primary sense and thus re-learn multiple meanings and interpretations of sound and its relations with images.

After taking this course, students should be ready for upper-level courses that are research-based and aim at exploring further on novelty of time-based media. This course also supports students working on other areas of arts with elements of moving image and sound, such as interactive media, hypermedia and installation art works.

This course aims at offering students unconventional perspectives on moving image and sound. Notions of creativity and usages of digital moving image and sound gears as artistic tools are highlighted. Hence, the course strongly encourages mixed genres and personal experiments.

Students will learn the art of moving image and sound that inherently stress the significance of experimentation in visual rhetoric, mass media (TV) criticism, and the spirits of boldness in contemporary art making. Students will learn histories, technological/cultural contexts and artistic practices of experimental film/video art.

As an intermediate level course, students will learn digital video production including camera work and the use of supported gears, the craft of three-point lighting and its variations, and also the knowledge of safety and different types of lighting gears. Regarding the idea of sound, it goes beyond the common practice of audio production as supplementary and secondary to visuals. Students will unlearn sense of sight as their primary sense and thus re-learn multiple meanings and interpretations of sound and its relations with images.

After taking this course, students should be ready for upper-level courses that are research-based and aim at exploring further on novelty of time-based media. This course also supports students working on other areas of arts with elements of moving image and sound, such as interactive media, hypermedia and installation art works.

VART 3137 Narrative Photography

Course code: VART 3137
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Looking through the Lens OR Sound: The Basics
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2135 OR VART2136

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In the post-medium culture, artists no longer identify themselves as a practitioner in a specific medium, but rather work across multiple mediums to create a rich visual dialogue. Therefore, this course is an attempt to bring together photography and performance art, with the awareness of “the act depicted in the photography”, “the unpremeditated photographic action” as the style of mid-twentieth-century photojournalism and lomography: snapshots, “an act/performance created for a photograph” and “a stand-alone picture to present a pictorial narrative.” Referencing photographers who create images relating to fables, fairy tales, apocryphal events and modern myths – a collective consciousness, this course will further develop creative processes and innovative works that explores the possibilities in an active moment that is not simply captured by a still frame, but will continue beyond the image.

This studio course will launch an interactive dialogue between photography and performance art. Students will explore the different creative processes between these two art mediums, discovering the similarities and differences in each, and utilizing the knowledge gained from both in developing time-based photography. Discussions and presentations will focus on narrative compositions (such as directing an event, specifically for the camera), surveillance, process and documentation as art, and the use of text in photography.In the post-medium culture, artists no longer identify themselves as a practitioner in a specific medium, but rather work across multiple mediums to create a rich visual dialogue. Therefore, this course is an attempt to bring together photography and performance art, with the awareness of “the act depicted in the photography”, “the unpremeditated photographic action” as the style of mid-twentieth-century photojournalism and lomography: snapshots, “an act/performance created for a photograph” and “a stand-alone picture to present a pictorial narrative.” Referencing photographers who create images relating to fables, fairy tales, apocryphal events and modern myths – a collective consciousness, this course will further develop creative processes and innovative works that explores the possibilities in an active moment that is not simply captured by a still frame, but will continue beyond the image.

This studio course will launch an interactive dialogue between photography and performance art. Students will explore the different creative processes between these two art mediums, discovering the similarities and differences in each, and utilizing the knowledge gained from both in developing time-based photography. Discussions and presentations will focus on narrative compositions (such as directing an event, specifically for the camera), surveillance, process and documentation as art, and the use of text in photography.

VART 3145 Sculpture: Form and Applications

Course code: VART 3145
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Sculpture: Materials and Processes OR Installation Art
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2145 OR VART 2147

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Direct carving is a technique that has been utilized since the beginnings of civilization. The course will focus on such subtractive process and/or the use of reductive thinking as a creative tool to explore sculptural forms. Students will investigate how form can be revealed through different carving approaches and techniques.

In this course students will study the use of working models, templates as well as to work directly with the material to experience both systematic and intuitive methods for producing sculptural form. Students will also examine the application aspects of sculptural form in large scale public sculpture / environmental project through scaled models and appropriate visual presentation formats.

Direct carving is a technique that has been utilized since the beginnings of civilization. The course will focus on such subtractive process and/or the use of reductive thinking as a creative tool to explore sculptural forms. Students will investigate how form can be revealed through different carving approaches and techniques.

In this course students will study the use of working models, templates as well as to work directly with the material to experience both systematic and intuitive methods for producing sculptural form. Students will also examine the application aspects of sculptural form in large scale public sculpture / environmental project through scaled models and appropriate visual presentation formats.

VART 3147 Public Art

Course code: VART 3147
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Sculpture: Materials and Processes OR Installation Art
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2145 OR VART 2147

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Traditionally the concept of public art has mainly been related to monuments and statues in public spaces. Later its form were diversified through various interpretations of the “public”, and as a result not only includes outdoor sculptures and murals to functional works integrated into architecture, but also site-specificity works, community based projects and interactive street performances. Nowadays, a new sense of public art refers to any art that happens and exhibits in a public domain, which may be art in “public places”, art that “creates public spaces”, and art of “public interest”. Public art does not simply refer to already existing physical urban sites such as parks, squares, streets or cities, but actually aims to re-interpret various social and cultural spaces and their functions.

This is a practice-based course, which includes conceptual and practical exercises relating to public art, as well as investigating and exploring new possibilities of art in the public arena. It will provide students with new concepts and approaches to explore art as a public situation. Students will establish public art in their geographical, political and social context, allowing them to integrate art and life within their personal living space and community. Students will further understand the concept of 2D & 3D art work, site-specific work, performances in contextuality and art in daily life, making this course also a valuable experience for students interested in Sculpture, Spatial Design, Installation Art and Performance Art.

Traditionally the concept of public art has mainly been related to monuments and statues in public spaces. Later its form were diversified through various interpretations of the “public”, and as a result not only includes outdoor sculptures and murals to functional works integrated into architecture, but also site-specificity works, community based projects and interactive street performances. Nowadays, a new sense of public art refers to any art that happens and exhibits in a public domain, which may be art in “public places”, art that “creates public spaces”, and art of “public interest”. Public art does not simply refer to already existing physical urban sites such as parks, squares, streets or cities, but actually aims to re-interpret various social and cultural spaces and their functions.

This is a practice-based course, which includes conceptual and practical exercises relating to public art, as well as investigating and exploring new possibilities of art in the public arena. It will provide students with new concepts and approaches to explore art as a public situation. Students will establish public art in their geographical, political and social context, allowing them to integrate art and life within their personal living space and community. Students will further understand the concept of 2D & 3D art work, site-specific work, performances in contextuality and art in daily life, making this course also a valuable experience for students interested in Sculpture, Spatial Design, Installation Art and Performance Art.

VART 3155 Bodily perception in Artistic Practice

Course code: VART3155
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Bodyscape or Interactive Art
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2155 or VART2156

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Gaining perceptual experience through our bodily senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch and motion), and making use of it to discern various circumstances in the surroundings is the common ground for human communication. From the perspective of visual arts practice, this course aims to extend students’ sensibility and capability in employing perceptual experience as a means of artistic investigations and expressions. It will also open up students’ vision and mind to new creative possibilities. The study of bodily perception will be introduced in both practical and theoretical aspects in which relevant reading materials on Body Aesthetics and related art movements in the 20th Century will be explored.

With the influences of Dada, Fluxus, Happening, Performance and other related art movements in the 20th Century, the phenomenon of artists presenting art with their own bodies has become common. It particularly refers to the exploration of bodily perception and its possible implication in artistic expression. In recent years, this phenomenon extends to a wider scope of artistic practice and is now applied to more diverse creative disciplines such as wearable, spatial, product, multimedia and interface design. The study of bodily perception thus suggests an interdisciplinary platform to integrate various art forms and creative practices.
Gaining perceptual experience through our bodily senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch and motion), and making use of it to discern various circumstances in the surroundings is the common ground for human communication. From the perspective of visual arts practice, this course aims to extend students’ sensibility and capability in employing perceptual experience as a means of artistic investigations and expressions. It will also open up students’ vision and mind to new creative possibilities. The study of bodily perception will be introduced in both practical and theoretical aspects in which relevant reading materials on Body Aesthetics and related art movements in the 20th Century will be explored.

With the influences of Dada, Fluxus, Happening, Performance and other related art movements in the 20th Century, the phenomenon of artists presenting art with their own bodies has become common. It particularly refers to the exploration of bodily perception and its possible implication in artistic expression. In recent years, this phenomenon extends to a wider scope of artistic practice and is now applied to more diverse creative disciplines such as wearable, spatial, product, multimedia and interface design. The study of bodily perception thus suggests an interdisciplinary platform to integrate various art forms and creative practices.

VART 3157 Human Machine Interface

Course code: VART 3157
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Bodyscape or Interactive Art
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2155 OR VART 2156

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Digital media products have moved beyond the use of standard graphical interface. Buttons and display screens will not be sufficient to cater for the ubiquitous and mobile usage. Moreover, contemporary interactive artworks often embed the interfaces into a spatial environment or custom made artefacts. Both cases demand a revisit of the existing desktop metaphor and the graphical user interface. These interfaces are the subject of the studies. The course aims to investigate the creative use of physical interfaces for digital media artworks and products.
Because digital technologies are incorporated into our daily life, there is a crucial need to strengthen the communication between these systems and their users. The interaction between the digital and the physical world is a field with increasing meaning for designers and artists. This course will explore the history of interface design – related to time and space – with regards to usability and cultural issues. The development of interfaces has always been driven by technical progress along with the needs of human beings. By analysing users’ interaction with machines, and adopting knowledge on basic electronics and computer programming, students will research on interaction design, digital media content and create new concepts for interfaces that enhance users’ experience.

Media art relies much on the audio and visual senses to engage audience. Interactive media has its uniqueness to employ the tactile sense to create a total sensation for audience. Early interactive artworks start by using ‘classical’ devices of mouse and keyboard to couple the audience’s actions and the audio and visual transformation of virtual objects on screen. More sophisticated works embed the interacting devices into a spatial environment or custom made artefacts. In both cases, audience has an embodied experience with the artworks through the exchange of information channelled in the sense of touch.

Because digital technologies are incorporated into our daily life, there is a crucial need to strengthen the communication between these systems and their users. These interfaces are the subject of the course. Students will create new hardware interfaces using electronics and sensors that can replace the mouse and keyboard. Basic design skills and knowledge of Adobe Creative suite are expected.

The interaction between the digital and the physical world is a field with increasing meaning for designers and artists. This course will explore the history of interface design – related to time and space – with regards to usability and cultural issues. The development of interfaces has always been driven by technical progress along with the needs of human beings. Students will research experience design, products design, and digital content and create new concepts for interfaces.

VART 3195 Further Studies in Studio and Media Arts (Sculpture)

Course code: VART 3195
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by offering instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Studio & Media Arts.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Studio & Media Arts from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Studio & Media Arts at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Studio & Media Arts Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3196 Further Studies in Studio and Media Arts (Body as Interface)

Course code: VART 3196
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: To be specified by offering instructor
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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Studio & Media Arts.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Studio & Media Arts from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Studio & Media Arts at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Studio & Media Arts Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 2215 Typography

Course code: VART 2215
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Typography means selection, scaling and organizing letters on a blank page or screen. It is one of the graphic designer’s most basic challenges. Typography is the tool to communicate any kind of content. Based on the students’ prerequisite knowledge and experience in design, they will further broaden their understanding of micro and macro typography, developing and using grids in typography, preparing data for the print process and using the PDF-format for publishing content online. Additionally, through lectures, plus research and practice students will strengthen their expertise in design history, and study the work of prominent designers in the field of graphic design.

Typography addresses issues that are useful for all disciplines of Visual Arts – ranging from design practices to fine arts. However, its principles are especially useful for Information Aesthetics, Book Design and Exhibition Design.

VART 2216 Graphic Storytelling

Course code: VART 2216
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART1006

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"To be a person is to have a story to tell." - Isak Dinesen

Storytelling is a fundamental element in many creative processes; comic art is a medium that best illustrates its importance through arrangement of visual elements and image-text interactions. This course aims to provide a platform for the students to specifically look into the aesthetics of storytelling. It emphasizes on both the training of practical skills and the investigation of the language of comic and sequential illustrations.

Through the introduction of theories by scholars and artists like Scott McCloud and Will Eisner, and the examination of the recent local independent comic art movement, students are provided with a critical framework to read and understand comics in a new perspective. They will become able to analyze and appreciate local and international works within a specific social and cultural context.

The course also take a look into the process of how abstract concepts and fragmented ideas are transformed into concrete message before it is delivered to the reader creatively. They are required to conduct research in various drawing styles based on the discussion of storytelling methods as presented in Matt Madden’s 99 Ways to Tell a Story.

Besides, a series of studio workshop will be held to provide practical training in the areas such as story structure, scriptwriting, drafting, drawing, inking and the publishing process. Students will be encouraged to experiment with various production methods, and to start developing their unique way of presentation as a first step in becoming a professional illustrator or comic writer.

VART 2217 Illustration

Course code: VART 2217
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Illustration is a fundament subject in visual arts that provides basic training in observation, integration and expression. Apart from the formal functions such as giving information and commentary, narration and persuasion, it allows artist to establish their own artistic identity through manipulation of image and text in an expressive way.

This course aims to let students purely focus on the image-making process. They are encouraged to experiment with different tools and materials before they invent their new approach to create image. The use of non-traditional tools could enhance their problem-solving skills since they will have to work with the limitations of the tools. During the process, they will need to explore and examine the specificity of the tools or medium in use. Such experience will help them to make decision and develop their own strategy during the creative process in the future.

Areas covered in the course will be: Digital illustration, hand-made graphics, tactile illustration, graffiti and other non-traditional image-making methods such as paper cut-out, collage and stitching. Although the majority of the course is skill-based training, the design assignment also requires students to learn how to articulate ideas and integrate different skills into a well-planned creative strategy.

VART 2226 Design for Hypermedia

Course code: VART 2226
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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The Internet has become an important – if not the most important – channel of our media-based communication, and it makes good sense for designers and artists to have the creative and also technical skills to develop concepts for the hypermedia. The World Wide Web is a classic and popular example of hypermedia. Accordingly the purpose of this course is to give an introduction to the Internet as an artistic medium and provide a foundation of historical, cultural and technical knowledge related to Internet art.
The core of the course will be developing students’ own artistic voice using this particular way of communication. That includes the examination of theory, history and practices of Internet art and related concepts of hypermedia, open source, connectivity, non-linear narrative and hacktivism. At the same time students will learn the basic technologies and design skills to publish their artistic statements and concepts online.

VART 2227 Printmaking

Course code: VART 2227
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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This course is an introduction to the techniques and theories central to the practice of Printmaking. Initially it aims at providing students with an overview of both traditional and contemporary printmaking, printing processes, and the value of printmaking in the contemporary visual arts landscape. Following this more theoretical opening, this is a practical course designed to allow students to explore and experiment with printmaking in its various forms and applications, and to develop their critical understanding of the uniqueness of this creative field of practice.

 

Through exposure to hands-on projects, students will become acquainted with a range of printing processes including mono printing, relief printing, Intaglio printing, lithography, screen-printing and digital printing. Students will first focus on traditional techniques, then progress to applying contemporary techniques.

 

By the end of the course, students will endeavour to experimentally print with and on uncommon materials, and to combine various printing techniques to find a personal way of expressing their visual ideas in print.

VART 2235 From Liquid to Solid: The Art of Glass Blowing

Course code: VART 2235
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Glass is known as solid-liquid, and is a highly versatile material. Glass is used in everyday life – in functional tableware and related products, – or as a medium for fine art production. Glass advances and enriches our life through science, architecture, interior design, everyday products and fine art expression. It is hard to imagine living in a world without glass.

Among the many ways of glass making, Glass Blowing is the most exciting method, and also a unique skill among art materials. Glass Blowing introduces students to the most beautiful and functional way of designing objects while expressing their own artistic ideas. Students will explore the endless possibilities of hot glass, while increasing their confidence and accuracy required for craftsmanship.

This course is an introduction to basic techniques of Glass Blowing as fundamental to glass art. It teaches many ways of glass making from hot-shop techniques such as making paper-weights, cups, vessels and hot sculptures, to cold-shop techniques such as grinding, polishing, engraving and sandblasting. Students will learn how to handle the punty and pipe to gather hot-liquid glass out from an 1180°C furnace. They will learn to make solid sculptures with the punty, and to deliver breath through the pipe, to blow a bubble into a cup, a vessel, or a hollow form for sculpture.

Students will explore the potential of hot glass, to express their ideas/designs through the voice of hot-glass, and finalize their products with cold-working techniques. Learning Glass Blowing will allow students to apply their knowledge in drawing, sculpture, installation and design, thus enabling a broader dimension of artistic expression, as well as activating their imagination.

Glass is known as solid-liquid, and is a highly versatile material. Glass is used in everyday life – in functional tableware and related products, – or as a medium for fine art production. Glass advances and enriches our life through science, architecture, interior design, everyday products and fine art expression. It is hard to imagine living in a world without glass.

Among the many ways of glass making, Glass Blowing is the most exciting method, and also a unique skill among art materials. Glass Blowing introduces students to the most beautiful and functional way of designing objects while expressing their own artistic ideas. Students will explore the endless possibilities of hot glass, while increasing their confidence and accuracy required for craftsmanship.

This course is an introduction to basic techniques of Glass Blowing as fundamental to glass art. It teaches many ways of glass making from hot-shop techniques such as making paper-weights, cups, vessels and hot sculptures, to cold-shop techniques such as grinding, polishing, engraving and sandblasting. Students will learn how to handle the punty and pipe to gather hot-liquid glass out from an 1180°C furnace. They will learn to make solid sculptures with the punty, and to deliver breath through the pipe, to blow a bubble into a cup, a vessel, or a hollow form for sculpture.

Students will explore the potential of hot glass, to express their ideas/designs through the voice of hot-glass, and finalize their products with cold-working techniques. Learning Glass Blowing will allow students to apply their knowledge in drawing, sculpture, installation and design, thus enabling a broader dimension of artistic expression, as well as activating their imagination.

VART 2236 Ceramic Art: From Pinched Pot to Sculptural Form

Course code: VART 2236
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Clay is the most natural and primal element on earth. Its plasticity makes it the most tactile hands-on material in artefact making, while its durability after firing retains a long history of ceramic art in almost all developed cultures. Ceramic artefacts, from shaping of clay to purposed glazing and firing, are completely individual-made, which allows artists to express themselves in this three dimensional medium. Therefore, ceramic art now is treated as traditional craft as well as contemporary art.

This is a studio course designed to teach students the basic hand-building and throwing techniques involved in constructing and surface decorating ceramic forms, from functional ware to sculpture. It creates a practical basis for addressing perceptual and aesthetic concerns as related to formal concepts such as balance, structure, continuity, texture and the spatial relationship between objects. Students will be encouraged to develop their own means of personal expression while working through assignments based on different ceramic techniques and skills.

By learning special hand-building and throwing techniques, and exploring the physical properties of clay as a hands-on creative material, this course enhances the ability of students to express eloquently their ideas through three-dimensional representation, especially with the transformation to one single material.

Starting from the aspect of function, students have to investigate the cultural significance of these functional wares, the relationship of details and the functions, and also the connection of these object-forms with the makers and users. In addition to learning the skills and process of making functional studio pottery, students will also be taught for creating vessel-form as art form for aesthetic expression. This in the end conducts to non-functional sculptural concepts in clay using hand-building and various decorating techniques. Emphasises will be put on the development of construction skills and an understanding of form/space relation, surface treatment, and firing possibilities.

Clay is the most natural and primal element on earth. Its plasticity makes it the most tactile hands-on material in artefact making, while its durability after firing retains a long history of ceramic art in almost all developed cultures. Ceramic artefacts, from shaping of clay to purposed glazing and firing, are completely individual-made, which allows artists to express themselves in this three dimensional medium. Therefore, ceramic art now is treated as traditional craft as well as contemporary art.

This is a studio course designed to teach students the basic hand-building and throwing techniques involved in constructing and surface decorating ceramic forms, from functional ware to sculpture. It creates a practical basis for addressing perceptual and aesthetic concerns as related to formal concepts such as balance, structure, continuity, texture and the spatial relationship between objects. Students will be encouraged to develop their own means of personal expression while working through assignments based on different ceramic techniques and skills.

By learning special hand-building and throwing techniques, and exploring the physical properties of clay as a hands-on creative material, this course enhances the ability of students to express eloquently their ideas through three-dimensional representation, especially with the transformation to one single material.

Starting from the aspect of function, students have to investigate the cultural significance of these functional wares, the relationship of details and the functions, and also the connection of these object-forms with the makers and users. In addition to learning the skills and process of making functional studio pottery, students will also be taught for creating vessel-form as art form for aesthetic expression. This in the end conducts to non-functional sculptural concepts in clay using hand-building and various decorating techniques. Emphasises will be put on the development of construction skills and an understanding of form/space relation, surface treatment, and firing possibilities.

VART 2245 Wearables: Material and Processes

Course code: VART 2245
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Wearables are artefacts worn on the human body, enhancing a given feature of the body or creating an entirely new interface for interaction, thus extending the traditional function of clothing into new artistic or functional areas. It is the aim of this course to introduce students to materials, processes and techniques necessary to be working in this field, which interprets the human body as an interface for creative expression.

Accordingly the course covers basic techniques for designing with textiles, pattern making and pattern alteration such as square blocking, contour sectioning and pivoting, which enables learners to develop creative concepts into wearable designs. These represent the initial skills required to proceed to more experimental wearable applications in subsequent courses.

Building on to this foundation, through studio exercises, student research and studio practice the students are invited to explore various approaches, concepts and materials for the creation of wearable artefacts. This knowledge shall then be applied to produce a wearable piece or body extension from the very first design sketch to a finished prototype.Wearables are articles worn on the human body, enhancing a given feature of the body or creating an entirely new interface for interaction, thus extending the traditional function of clothing into new artistic or functional areas. Accordingly the aim of the course is to interpret the human body as an interface for artistic expression.

The course offers an introduction to the broad scope of wearables and covers basic techniques for designing, pattern making and pattern alteration such as square blocking, contour sectioning and pivoting, which enables learners to develop creative concepts into wearable designs.

Building on to this foundation, through studio exercises, student research and studio practice the students are invited to explore various approaches, concepts and materials for the creation of wearables. This knowledge shall be applied to design a set of wearable pieces or body extensions from the very first design sketch to a finished prototype, taking in the contemporary discourse on the topic.

Wearables connects the three-dimensional design-area with disciplines like theatre, film or performance art. Most obvious applications are theatre-costumes, but wearable design-pieces that are based on a particular view of the world or a particular spatial environment are rather common throughout the art- or design-scene.

VART 2246 Small Metal Jewellery

Course code: VART 2246
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Mankind has developed personal decoration and ornaments for thousands of years. Jewellery has always been an expression and reflection of its epoch, its social structures and cultural standards. Since the past fifty years, jewellery is now no more the privilege of the wealthy, as the social structure of contemporary societies has broadened considerably, and allows the concept of jewellery to be understood far more universal: In a contemporary sense, jewellery has become a collective noun for body-related objects.

This is an introductory course in jewellery making, with a focus on metalsmithing for small objects. It is designed to introduce non-ferrous metal as an expressive medium and to explore the unique properties it has to offer. Students will learn various ways of working metal, and how these techniques can be applied to the creation of small metal objects. Emphasis will be put on how these objects can be related to the human body. Basic 3D design concepts will be used to demonstrate these possibilities. The students will be introduced to the contemporary views of jewellery, and begin to appreciate jewellery as an art form.

Through studying this diversified art form, the students can broaden their appreciation of the world around their body. The students will develop a sense of scale, and will have an enhanced sensitivity in relating their work to the environment. They will also practice thinking in 3D.

Mankind has developed personal decoration and ornaments for thousands of years. Jewellery has always been an expression and reflection of its epoch, its social structures and cultural standards. Since the past fifty years, jewellery is now no more the privilege of the wealthy, as the social structure of contemporary societies has broadened considerably, and allows the concept of jewellery to be understood far more universal: In a contemporary sense, jewellery has become a collective noun for body-related objects.

This is an introductory course in jewellery making, with a focus on metalsmithing for small objects. It is designed to introduce non-ferrous metal as an expressive medium and to explore the unique properties it has to offer. Students will learn various ways of working metal, and how these techniques can be applied to the creation of small metal objects. Emphasis will be put on how these objects can be related to the human body. Basic 3D design concepts will be used to demonstrate these possibilities. The students will be introduced to the contemporary views of jewellery, and begin to appreciate jewellery as an art form.

Through studying this diversified art form, the students can broaden their appreciation of the world around their body. The students will develop a sense of scale, and will have an enhanced sensitivity in relating their work to the environment. They will also practice thinking in 3D.

VART 2255 Design Thinking

Course code: VART 2255
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1006

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Next to ‘object’ the central concept in three-dimensional visual arts is ‘space’. In opposite to objects however, the nature, essence, and the mode of existence of space, even the ultimate definition of space are still debated.

In this context ‘site’ can be defined as spatial mark-making: by distinguishing a particular place within space through an intervention of any kind this location becomes a site.

Space & Site is a course dedicated to concepts and techniques necessary for all those designers and artists who want to work with space as a medium. It includes introductions to contemporary space-related theories and also some of the most important spatial designs of the 20th and 21st century. It also familiarises participants with planning tools such as technical drafting, model making and virtual representations of space, as well as with the basic principles of constructions.

These acquired skills and knowledge will be practiced in a number of small exercises and one medium-sized project at the scale of a city-furniture or small architectural object.

Upon completion of this course a participant will have the means to develop and conceptualize his/her spatial ideas and present them adequately to an audience of professionals. Especially students who would like to continue their studies into three dimensional subject areas like exhibition design, and installation will benefit from this course.Next to ‘object’ the central concept in three-dimensional visual arts is ‘space’. In opposite to objects however, the nature, essence, and the mode of existence of space, even the ultimate definition of space are still debated.

In this context ‘site’ can be defined as spatial mark-making: by distinguishing a particular place within space through an intervention of any kind this location becomes a site.

Space & Site is a course dedicated to concepts and techniques necessary for all those designers and artists who want to work with space as a medium. It includes introductions to contemporary space-related theories and also some of the most important spatial designs of the 20th and 21st century. It also familiarises participants with planning tools such as technical drafting, model making and virtual representations of space, as well as with the basic principles of constructions.

These acquired skills and knowledge will be practiced in a number of small exercises and one medium-sized project at the scale of a city-furniture or small architectural object.

Upon completion of this course a participant will have the means to develop and conceptualize his/her spatial ideas and present them adequately to an audience of professionals. Especially students who would like to continue their studies into three dimensional subject areas like exhibition design, and installation will benefit from this course.

VART 2257 Prototyping

Course code: VART 2257
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Visual Arts Practice II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART1006

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A prototype is an early sample, model, or release of an artefact built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from. ‘Prototyping’ refers to a group of analogue and digital techniques that allow the fabrication of such scale model.

Computers and digital technology allow us to work within a virtual space. Three-dimensional software allows us to play with form and space without dealing with the consequences or natural properties of the actual form in an actual space. The visual artist may explore and expand their creative practice into this virtual world and by harnessing its advantages create new forms and new spaces.

This course will introduce students to a variety of prototyping techniques, starting from the traditional analogue to contemporary digital practices. Students will initially learn to build basic models from materials such as cardboard, wood and acrylic. After this they will be exposed to basic 3D software to create suitable models for production, and then learn how to produce their initially virtual ideas via computer-controlled machinery.

This course is project based and will focus on technical demonstration and a continuous studio practice to inspire in the students the abilities to think fluidly about how ideas can be filtered through prototyping. They will then take on more complex projects based on their ability to use the software. This course is designed to show what the prototyping may do to extend the students’ creativity into alternative mediums and processes. The core objective of this course is to give students an ability to play with such techniques so as to expand their creative output in whatever creative area they may choose to practice in later.

VART 3205 Further Studies in Craft and Design (Graphic Book)

Course code: VART 3205
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name:
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by offering instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Craft & Design.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Craft & Design from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Craft & Design at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Craft & Design Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

3206 | Further Studies in Craft and Design (Experimental Imaging)

Course code: VART3206
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by offering instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Craft & Design.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Craft & Design from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Craft & Design at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Craft & Design Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3207 Further Studies in Craft and Design (Glass & Ceramics)

Course code: VART 3207
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by offering instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Craft & Design.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Craft & Design from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Craft & Design at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Craft & Design Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3215 Picture Book

Course code: VART 3215
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Typography OR Graphic Storytelling
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2215 OR VART2216

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This course aims to develop student’s storytelling skills and the ability to conceptualize complex visualization in the form of picture book. It provides a platform for the students to explore how images, text, graphics and other visual elements can be used to inform, explain and narrate complex “story” in a unique and creative way.

The course emphasizes the importance of research in the stage of idea-development. Through lectures, workshops and field trip, students will have chance to explore various methodologies that could help them to conduct research on related topics. They will need to initiate their own story idea and develop strategy to gather, organize and articulate contents and information for creative use.

To enrich student’s visual language, advance topics in story structure, story setting, character design, visualization, image-text interactions and book illustration will be covered. Students are also encouraged to experiment with various approaches in visual expression in order to establish their own personal style.

Besides, the course will provide a comprehensive overview of the history and contemporary practice in the areas stated above by introducing classical works and modern examples. Alternative and cutting-edge models of publishing methods will also be examined to encourage students to challenge the concept of a “picture book”.
Design does not only intend to make things beautiful, but has the ability to communicate ideas and messages clearly and effectively. This course aims to develop student’s ability to solve design problems and conceptualize complex visualization in an analytical approach. It provides a platform for the students to explore how images, text, graphics and other design elements can be used to inform, explain and narrate complex and difficult contents in a unique and creative way.

In the course, students will be able to enhance their analytical thinking and problem solving skills in a self-assigned project. They will learn how to choose suitable topics and define the context before they start to develop their own design strategy through observations, information gathering, organization of contents and practical experiments throughout the process.

To enrich student’s visual language, advance topics in visualization, information design, editorial design, instructional and editorial Illustration will be introduced with an emphasis on effective design principles. Exercises, case studies and workshops will be used to strengthen student’s technical skills as well as the ability of problem solving.

Besides, the course will provide a comprehensive overview of the history and contemporary practice in the areas stated above by introducing classical works and modern examples found in our everyday life such as magazines, textbooks, comics, user’s manual and picture books etc. Alternative and cutting-edge models of graphic design and publishing methods will also be examined to encourage students to adopt a more experimental approach in the creative process in order to explore one’s unique touch and style in design and image making.

VART 3216 Cover to Cover

Course code: VART 3216
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Typography or Graphic Storytelling
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2215 or VART 2216

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For centuries, reading a book was the only one way of save-travelling to faraway places, unknown cultures and bold adventures. Even time travel and the transforming to another identity were possible while lounging in an armchair at home and reading a book. Today we have more opportunities to get into a story by listening to an audio book, watching movie or playing computer games. But even the medium book is changing its nature from analogue to digital (Kindle and iPad, only to name the famous one).

Despite all these innovations, the traditional printed book is still the most common and most successful distribution format for text- and image-based content. Still the number of printed publication is rising every year. Book design is still the ultimate achievement for any 2D-designer. The innumerable contents of books cannot be covered by one standard design of an anonymous iBook. Not just the physical design of the ‘anatomy’ of a book – spine, cover, binding, front, body, and back – but also the canons of proportion, grids, formats, openings and page design in combination create the essential experience of a good read. And these are only the basics. In addition a digital book cannot replace the sensory experience of touching, smelling and hearing the pages of an analog book.

This course critically evaluates contemporary book design by exploring the changing formats of the book in history, and in the context of the visual arts: as craft, as product, as art and as medium. It introduces the business of publishing, and its terminology, as well as essential knowledge of printing technologies. Most of all however, the course aims at providing the tools, skills and creative approaches to design and produce a book with self given content and constraints.

After all, it is the purpose of the course to create a book that does not depend on conventional templates but develops from an understanding of competing conventions. The course builds confidence in creative organisation and management of content for a wide range of publication practice in contemporary visual arts. It is the point of culmination within the course sequence of the Graphic art-cluster that intends to bring together all previously acquired skills in one project.
For centuries, reading a book was the only one way of save-travelling to faraway places, unknown cultures and bold adventures. Even time travel and the transforming to another identity were possible while lounging in an armchair at home and reading a book. Today we have more opportunities to get into a story by listening to an audio book, watching movie or playing computer games. But even the medium book is changing its nature from analogue to digital (Kindle and iPad, only to name the famous one).

Despite all these innovations, the traditional printed book is still the most common and most successful distribution format for text- and image-based content. Still the number of printed publication is rising every year. Book design is still the ultimate achievement for any 2D-designer. The innumerable contents of books cannot be covered by one standard design of an anonymous iBook. Not just the physical design of the ‘anatomy’ of a book – spine, cover, binding, front, body, and back – but also the canons of proportion, grids, formats, openings and page design in combination create the essential experience of a good read. And these are only the basics. In addition a digital book cannot replace the sensory experience of touching, smelling and hearing the pages of an analog book.

This course critically evaluates contemporary book design by exploring the changing formats of the book in history, and in the context of the visual arts: as craft, as product, as art and as medium. It introduces the business of publishing, and its terminology, as well as essential knowledge of printing technologies. Most of all however, the course aims at providing the tools, skills and creative approaches to design and produce a book with self given content and constraints.

After all, it is the purpose of the course to create a book that does not depend on conventional templates but develops from an understanding of competing conventions. The course builds confidence in creative organisation and management of content for a wide range of publication practice in contemporary visual arts. It is the point of culmination within the course sequence of the Graphic art-cluster that intends to bring together all previously acquired skills in one project.

VART 3217 Illustrated Narratives

Course code: VART3217
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Typography or Illustration
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2215 or VART2217

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"To be a person is to have a story to tell." Isak Dinesen

 

Storytelling is essential in many creative processes; comic art is a medium that best illustrates its importance through arrangement of visual elements and image-text interactions. This course aims to provide a platform for the students to further develop their sense and understandings in visual communication through the creation of story in the form of comics after they gain fundamental skills in the area of graphic design and illustration.

 

One major focus of the course is to enhance student’s ability to generate story ideas. Workshops about creative writing and other experimental approaches in writing will be provided to allow students to explore their own way of storytelling. Students are also encouraged to establish their individual visual language and graphic style. Through tutorials and projects, specific skills in various aspects such as scriptwriting, storyboarding, drafting, inking and even book making will be addressed.

Learning through experiments is an important component in the course. Apart from fundamental issues in the theories of Comics studies, topics about abstract comics, alternative comics and experimental comics will also be highlighted in order to provide a critical framework for the students to question what “story” could be. Case studies on artists such as Chris Ware and the French comic art group Oubapo will be carried out.

VART 3225 Hybrid Printmaking

Course code: VART 3225
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Experimental Illustration or Design for Hypermedia
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2225 or VART 2226

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Individual expressions of ideas and concepts in the printmaking studio used to be a domain of earlier print technologies like relief, intaglio, screen-printing and/or lithography, while technologies like photographic printing allowed a more mechanical approach. Most recently digital code is used to operate modern inkjet, dye sublimation and laser processes. All of these technologies rely on and produce printed results that can be affected and manipulated by the visual artist.

Hybrid Imaging reflects the interplay of manual and mechanical formats in printmaking and surfaces. It experiments with contemporary combinations of print formats to produce multi-layered explorations of the image, line, colour field, marks, visual expression and other contemporary hybrid identities. In its results it produces images based on personally developed, unique hybrid techniques of various forms of printmaking.

By understanding the characteristics of traditional and modern techniques and applications, students are enabled to expand the possibility of image making by transforming the use of printmaking in their own project. The processes of research, visual documentation, evaluation of outcomes and presentation of results contextualize and expose the impact that images have on our daily life in a metropolitan environment.

VART 3227 Evolutionary Graphics

Course code: VART 3227
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Experimental Imaging or Design for Hypermedia
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2225 or VART 2226

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The course introduces the ideas and practices of evolutionary and generative methods to create complex visual imageries. In the context of procedural animation and computer graphics, the concepts of evolutionary biology can both simulate the form of nature and as well go beyond it by creating static or dynamic graphics with little reference in the physical world.
Students in the course learn to create complex computer graphics by specifying very simple rules. They will understand the notion of artificial nature where the seemingly complex behaviours are developed by a number of simple mutually interacting units.
Historical reference will be drawn from a variety of disciplines like machine theory, algorithmic graphics, chaos theory, and self-organizing systems.
The course will introduce the use of the graphical programming environment such as TouchDesigner1 or Context Free Art2 that the students can use to experiment with generative graphics and procedural animation without the need to write traditional text based computer programs. The artworks can both be shown on screen or output as computer paintings.
By using the commonly available graphic design software, students usually work on computer graphics with a top down planning approach. The variety of the visual imageries will often be limited to the background and exposure of the students’ former visual training. This course offers a bottom up approach to facilitate students to overcome the former constraints. By purposely introducing rules and limitations, the generative or evolutionary processes can automatically produce imageries that challenge both the representational and abstract ways of two-dimensional visual creation.
The conceptual framework in the class is transferable and applicable to other subjects like 2D design, spatial design, and experimental painting. As computing software is becoming an important tool for visual art and design, the understanding of the codes, which are essentially rules, is a competitive advantage for students to expand their visual repertoire.

_____________________
[1] A free authoring tool for creating interactive 3D art, http://www.derivative.ca/
[2] A free software that generates images from written grammar, http://www.contextfreeart.org/ The course introduces the ideas and practices of evolutionary and generative methods to create complex visual imageries. In the context of procedural animation and computer graphics, the concepts of evolutionary biology can both simulate the form of nature and as well go beyond it by creating static or dynamic graphics with little reference in the physical world.

Students in the course learn to create complex computer graphics by specifying very simple rules. They will understand the notion of artificial nature where the seemingly complex behaviours are developed by a number of simple mutually interacting units.

Historical reference will be drawn from a variety of disciplines like machine theory, algorithmic graphics, chaos theory, and self-organizing systems.

The course will introduce the use of the graphical programming environment like vvvv[1], TouchDesigner[2] or Context Free Art[3] that the students can use to experiment with generative graphics and procedural animation without the need to write traditional text based computer programs. The artworks can both be shown on screen or output as computer paintings.

By using the commonly available graphic design software, students usually work on computer graphics with a top down planning approach. The variety of the visual imageries will often be limited to the background and exposure of the students’ former visual training. This course offers a bottom up approach to facilitate students to overcome the former constraints. By purposely introducing rules and limitations, the generative or evolutionary processes can automatically produce imageries that challenge both the representational and abstract ways of two-dimensional visual creation.

The conceptual framework in the class is transferable and applicable to other subjects like 2D design, spatial design, and experimental painting. As computing software is becoming an important tool for visual art and design, the understanding of the codes, which are essentially rules, is a competitive advantage for students to expand their visual repertoire.

_____________________

[1] A free multi-purpose video synthesis toolkit, http://vvvv.org/tiki-index.php
[2] A free authoring tool for creating interactive 3D art, http://www.derivative.ca/
[3] A free software that generates images from written grammar, http://www.contextfreeart.org/

VART 3235 From Zero Space to Infinite Dimension: The Art of Glass Casting

Course code: VART 3235
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: From Liquid to Solid: The Art of Glass Blowing OR Ceramic Art: From Pinched Pot to Sculptural Form
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2235 OR VART 2236

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Most objects have three dimensions; however glass can have infinite dimensions through the very light that travels through it and is captured within it. It is a unique quality of glass that it can be transparent, translucent and/or opaque. Such qualities make it possible for glass to express infinite dimensions externally and internally at a zero space.

Glass Casting is an ancient Chinese glass technique that can be dated back to the Warring State (BC 481-221). Now it is the primary glass art technique taught internationally and locally, and one of the main glass production methods used by artists and designers. It is also becoming an important art skill for creative industries, and it has a place in fine art, public art, spatial design and in architecture.

This course introduces the essential techniques of Glass Casting and its sufficient cold-working such as grinding and polishing for finishing the glass product. Students will explore the potential for Cast Glass artworks, and at the same time build a solid and sufficient knowledge base in Glass Casting skills and the accuracy required for good craftsmanship. This class will encourage the enhancement of aesthetic understanding, sensitivity to design, development of imagination, and the development of personal creative language.

Learning Glass Casting allows students to apply their understanding of two-dimensional concepts – drawing and design skills – to three-dimensional works. It also allows students to integrate their studies in sculpture, ceramics, jewellery, design and installation to formulate an interdisciplinary practice within Glass Casting.

The course will allow students to attain Glass Casting craftsmanship, and establish their personal creative language through different projects. It will also expose students to the history and development of Glass Casting and important examples of glass cast designs and art works.

Most objects have three dimensions; however glass can have infinite dimensions through the very light that travels through it and is captured within it. It is a unique quality of glass that it can be transparent, translucent and/or opaque. Such qualities make it possible for glass to express infinite dimensions externally and internally at a zero space.

Glass Casting is an ancient Chinese glass technique that can be dated back to the Warring State (BC 481-221). Now it is the primary glass art technique taught internationally and locally, and one of the main glass production methods used by artists and designers. It is also becoming an important art skill for creative industries, and it has a place in fine art, public art, spatial design and in architecture.

This course introduces the essential techniques of Glass Casting and its sufficient cold-working such as grinding and polishing for finishing the glass product. Students will explore the potential for Cast Glass artworks, and at the same time build a solid and sufficient knowledge base in Glass Casting skills and the accuracy required for good craftsmanship. This class will encourage the enhancement of aesthetic understanding, sensitivity to design, development of imagination, and the development of personal creative language.

Learning Glass Casting allows students to apply their understanding of two-dimensional concepts – drawing and design skills – to three-dimensional works. It also allows students to integrate their studies in sculpture, ceramics, jewellery, design and installation to formulate an interdisciplinary practice within Glass Casting.

The course will allow students to attain Glass Casting craftsmanship, and establish their personal creative language through different projects. It will also expose students to the history and development of Glass Casting and important examples of glass cast designs and art works.

VART 3236 From Object to Installation: The Art of Glass Kiln-Forming

Course code: VART 3236
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: From Liquid to Solid: The Art of Glass Blowing OR Ceramic Art: From Pinched Pot to Sculptural Form
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2235 or VART 2236

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In addition to Glass Blowing and Casting, Glass Kiln Forming is another essential set of glass-art techniques with more complex firing schedules due to the effect of different melting points. It is used widely in the creative industry, from small jewellery objects, daily table products, and interior designs to artistic works, by using fusible colour glass sheets, frits and powders, as well as window glass and recycled glass. This course focuses on three Kiln Forming techniques: Fusing, Slumping and Pate De Verre.
Slumping (660°C) transfers a sheet of glass from 2-D to 3-D, from a sketch to an object. Students learn to use a diamond cutter to cut glass sheets to compose various patterns, and to slump it over a ceramic mould to sag the forms in a kiln. Use of daily recycled glass and window glass are also introduced for Slumping.
The temperature of Fusing (750-840 °C) is higher than Slumping. Fusing is suitable for making jewellery objects, 2-D works, and components for interior designs as well as creating panels for Slumping projects.
Pate de Verre (700°C) is a French word “glass paste” by using different size and colour glass frits and powders mixed with CMC glue to apply over/into a mould (ceramics fibre or high-temperature plaster), then fused together by firing. The works could be thin as a leaf, detailed as lace, vivid as a flower and complex as a building.
The three Kiln Forming Techniques could be used individually or co-ordinately to realize concepts/ideas exquisitely. Sufficient glass Kiln Forming cold-working techniques will also be taught to facilitate a professional completion of the work. Students will explore the potential and wide possibilities of Kiln Forming while building up confidence and accuracy required for craftsmanship. It will provide students with good craft skills and an artistic base for their future career development in visual arts.

VART 3237 Creative Ceramics: Concept and Process

Course code: VART 3237
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Ceramic Art: From Pinched Pot to Sculptural Form
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2236

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Ceramic art, with its origin in craft, has been propelled by artistic movements, which integrated traditional techniques and aesthetics into the creation of contemporary artwork.

In this course, students will build on previously acquired ceramic skills by augmenting their ceramic knowledge through exposure to more advanced ceramic techniques and the viewing of high calibre ceramic artworks. It is also an exploration into the possibilities of ceramic material and techniques in artistic expression. Students have to tackle different problems in various projects with different approaches to ceramic art including a thematic project, in which students have to create within an assigned concept.

Using a variety of techniques, including paper-clay, advanced hand building and wheel throwing techniques, slip-casting and press-moulding, students will fabricate ceramic composite forms in non-functional approach. Image transfer and glaze test projects will also help students to develop their own messages on surface.

Forms constructed range from abstraction to images of found objects, where the aesthetic consideration will be opened to personal creative expression. Emphasis will be placed on the development of concept and the transformation to three dimensional clay objects. Students are encouraged to create independent work exhibiting personal symbols and content.

Students will further broaden their understanding of ceramics by visiting museums, galleries, and meeting artists at their studios. Additionally, through lectures and research, students will strengthen their historical knowledge of both traditional and contemporary ceramics, so that they can explore the issues of cultural identity and significance in their own work.Ceramic art, with its origin in craft, has been propelled by artistic movements, which integrated traditional techniques and aesthetics into the creation of contemporary artwork.

In this course, students will build on previously acquired ceramic skills by augmenting their ceramic knowledge through exposure to more advanced ceramic techniques and the viewing of high calibre ceramic artworks. It is also an exploration into the possibilities of ceramic material and techniques in artistic expression. Students have to tackle different problems in various projects with different approaches to ceramic art including a thematic project, in which students have to create within an assigned concept.

Using a variety of techniques, including paper-clay, advanced hand building and wheel throwing techniques, slip-casting and press-moulding, students will fabricate ceramic composite forms in non-functional approach. Image transfer and glaze test projects will also help students to develop their own messages on surface.

Forms constructed range from abstraction to images of found objects, where the aesthetic consideration will be opened to personal creative expression. Emphasis will be placed on the development of concept and the transformation to three dimensional clay objects. Students are encouraged to create independent work exhibiting personal symbols and content.

Students will further broaden their understanding of ceramics by visiting museums, galleries, and meeting artists at their studios. Additionally, through lectures and research, students will strengthen their historical knowledge of both traditional and contemporary ceramics, so that they can explore the issues of cultural identity and significance in their own work.

VART 3245 Body vs. Textiles

Course code: VART 3245
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Wearables: Materials and Processes or Small Metal Jewellery
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2245 or VART2246

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The coverings we use to envelop our body enhance or disguise, comfort or protect our physical body, but they also establish or confirm our identity, communicate our socio-cultural position, or extend our abilities beyond our personal limitations. This course investigates this notion of a ‘second skin’ in terms of the relationship of textiles and the (human) body, and explores the potential for new ideas and concepts that arise from this juxtaposition.

Continuing on students’ previous learning this course examines the properties and possibilities of textiles and alternative materials as well as the history and cultural significance of traditional techniques and their contemporary counterparts to synthesise new creative responses in wearable artefacts. To do so this course extends students knowledge in wearables by particularly emphasising the notion of ‘craft’ (fabrics and textural finishes; techniques of embellishment and detailing) and countering this with transdisciplinary concepts like hybridity, multi-functionalism, or serious games.

The friction that becomes apparent from these juxtapositions – old vs. new; craft vs. technology; practice vs. concepts; individual vs. society – A deeper understanding of the nature and effects of such tools and techniques will allow students to conceptually transcend traditional disciplinary distinctions by experimenting with non-traditional media and applications to produce body coverings of a new kind.Body coverings can be described as a second skin. This course investigates this notion in terms of intimacy and extimacy. ‘Intimacy’ describes the corporeal relationship of textiles and the body whilst ‘extimacy’ extends to the realm of luxury and display. Second Skin relates to wearables that are in intimate contact with the body; they enhance or disguise, comfort or protect us. Second Skins are three-dimensional objects that are formed through the manipulation of raw materials. The materials and techniques used in their creation are deeply interwoven with culture and tradition. This course expands the basic skills gained in Wearables-ReDraft adding the tools and techniques to create fabrics and textural finishes, which will be explored and combined to design and produce wearables and accessories.

Understanding the properties and structures of materials as well as the history and cultural significance of traditional techniques offers the designer a great scope for creativity. The students will be provided with technical skills to develop a fundamental understanding of textiles properties and their cultural significance necessary to produce creative products with a professional level of aesthetic and artistic integrity.

Through practical demonstration of traditional and contemporary textiles techniques including a range of non-loom and loom techniques as well as various methods of texturising, colouring and embellishment, students are encouraged to embrace cross-disciplinary approaches to develop new techniques and applications for body coverings.

The product outcomes will be wearables or accessories as forms of creative expression, design innovation or designs for practical applications in response to a written brief. Students will be expected to complete a range of samples and design concepts as well as a minimum of one wearable object.

VART 3246 Studio Jewellery

Course code: VART 3246
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Small Metal Jewellery
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2246

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From pre-historic time till the mid-twentieth Century, people wore jewellery to showcase their wealth, power, social and religious status, superiority and their aesthetic sense. After the Second World War, many of the societies in Europe and America were turned upside down.

The great loss of lives made many artists questioned the traditional values, and reflected on the question of self-identity. The scarcity of materials also pushed many artists to start making jewellery. Together with the new materials made available through technology advancement, the studio jewellery movement was born. At the core of the movement is a deep desire to establish values and identity through jewellery. In many ways, jewellery is the ideal art form to consider a person’s values, and to explore the possibilities of utilizing or challenging traditional meanings.

In this course, students will be guided to develop a series of work that reflects their stance on contemporary issues. They will start by studying the traditional meanings of jewellery, and their connections to the underlying craftsmanship. Once these connections are made, they will look at how the studio jewellery movement pushed these apart, and used new ideas and materials to create a new set of language. The students will then reflect on their own perception, develop a series of jewellery, and present their work and research findings to the class.Jewellery has always been about identity. From pre-historic time till the mid-twentieth Century, people wore jewellery to showcase their wealth, power, social and religious status, superiority and their aesthetic sense. After the Second World War, many of the societies in Europe and America were turned upside down.

The great loss of lives made many artists questioned the traditional values, and reflected on the question of self-identity. The scarcity of materials also pushed many artists to start making jewellery. Together with the new materials made available through technology advancement, the studio jewellery movement was born. At the core of the movement is a deep desire to establish value and identity through jewellery. In many ways, jewellery is the ideal art form to consider anxiety about identity, and to explore the possibilities of utilizing or challenging traditional meanings.

In this course, students will be guided to develop a series of work in exploring their own identity. They will start by studying the traditional meanings of jewellery, and their connections to the underlying craftsmanship. Once these connections are made, they will look at how the studio jewellery movement pushed these apart, and used new ideas and materials to create a new set of language. The students will then reflect on their own identity issues, develop a series of jewellery, and present their work and research findings to the class.

VART 3255 Exhibition Design (L)

Course code: VART 3255
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Design Thinking OR Prototyping
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2255 OR VART 2257

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Exhibition Design is potentially one of the most common, but also least recognized design-areas: despite the practice of exhibiting is found not only in museum- or gallery-exhibitions, but also in trade-fairs, showrooms, shops and various public institutions, there are not many programmes or courses dedicated to this specific area. Accordingly this course aims to equip students with the basic knowledge and skills for designing exhibits and displays for all kinds of situations, including the spatial arrangement of a site, the interior design for the space, exhibition-furniture and -graphics. However, it also intends to go beyond the professional practice of exhibit design, and explore the wider practice of exhibiting in general.

As this course aims at students who have already some experience in art-/design-related subjects, but not yet any systematic approach to Exhibit Design, the focus of the course will be on transferring knowledge, skills and personal experience from other subjects like Sculpture, Installation Art, Graphic Design and others, and to apply these in a new professional area that it sought for widely in many design-professions.Exhibition Design is potentially one of the most common, but also least recognized design-areas: despite the practice of exhibiting is found not only in museum- or gallery-exhibitions, but also in trade-fairs, showrooms, shops and various public institutions, there are not many programmes or courses dedicated to this specific area. Accordingly this course aims to equip students with the basic knowledge and skills for designing exhibits and displays for all kinds of situations, including the spatial arrangement of a site, the interior design for the space, exhibition-furniture and -graphics. However, it also intends to go beyond the professional practice of exhibit design, and explore the wider practice of exhibiting in general.

As this course aims at students who have already some experience in art-/design-related subjects, but not yet any systematic approach to Exhibit Design, the focus of the course will be on transferring knowledge, skills and personal experience from other subjects like Sculpture, Installation Art, Graphic Design and others, and to apply these in a new professional area that it sought for widely in many design-professions.

VART 3256 Furniture Design (M)

Course code: VART 3256
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Design Thinking OR Prototyping
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2255 OR VART2257

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Furniture Design is one of the oldest design-disciplines, having a history of roughly 40 centuries, and making this area something like a classic in itself. However, contemporary Furniture Design can also simply be seen as an applied approach to contemporary sculpture. This remarkable ambivalence of the subject allows for a rather wide range of approaches, and makes it a great area for experimentation in concepts, designs, materials, or crafting.

This course intends to equip students with basic knowledge and skills to work with the complex mix of technical, functional and aesthetical characteristics that is furniture design. It familiarizes the students with historical and theoretical aspects of furniture design, various materials for furniture making and respective crafting skills. This knowledge shall then be applied to develop one piece of furniture from its very first idea-stage to a finished object, that complies to a given class assignment as well as to a contemporary design approach.

VART 3257 Product Design (S)

Course code: VART 3257
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Design Thinking OR Prototyping
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2255 OR VART 2257

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Steve Jobs, founder and CEO of Apple, said that “Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it's really how it works.”

Product design is a creative discipline, which combines art and technology, ideas and materials, to improve our daily lives, protect our health and create new opportunities for the industry. It is the intention of this course to exactly foster this kind of imaginative design ideas and solutions that will make the world not only a more beautiful, but also a better place.

For this purpose the course will extend students’ knowledge of materials and processes – especially in applied technologies like 3D-printing – and support students to develop their ideas through several stages of exploration, testing and re-developing to ultimately come up with artefacts that are conceptually sound, technically and economically feasible, yet also e.g. ecologically sustainable.

Students will understand that the right choice of materials in combination with the appropriate processes in design and production are inseparably linked to the look and performance of any product.

VART 3295 Further Studies in Craft & Design (Wearables)

Course code: VART 3295
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name:
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by offering instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Craft & Design.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Craft & Design from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Craft & Design at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Craft & Design Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3296 Further Studies in Craft & Design (Objects & Environment)

Course code: VART 3296
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by offering instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Craft & Design.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Craft & Design from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Craft & Design at the current state of the arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Craft & Design Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 2315 Writing in Art and Culture

Course code: VART 2315
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Introduction to Visual Arts II or any GDCV courses offered by AVA or any Visual Arts courses
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART1006

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Writing on and about visual art is an essential element of artistic practice and has a multitude of uses from artist’s statements to exhibition, critical analysis and academic discourse. How the artist uses words, to analyse and describe works, becomes and necessary component in the dissemination and communication of the creative. The writing of the visual, explores the essence of communication and the positions and perspectives of artists and art writers. Art writing further provides primary sources to explore the changing role of the writing about art, from manifesto and critic to intention and reception.
This course will improve students’ individual research, critical analysis and written skills, in order to effectively express ideas for their own practice, and in interpreting and understanding the writings about art.

The course will examine fundamental skills of research practice, methods and methodology for practicing artists and academic writing on art. Revealing the relationship between art, creativity and language, as a methodology that can enhance communication and critical engagement with art theory and art historical writings. It will also assess writings on modern and contemporary visual arts practices by looking at how key texts from the past have informed present discourses on art.

We will examine a number of artists’ writings through selected examples of primary source materials; notes, correspondence, manifestos, and other printed matter, by those who work between art and also writing about art.

Writing on and about visual art is an essential element of artistic practice and has a multitude of uses from artist’s statements to exhibition, critical analysis and academic discourse. How the artist uses words, to analyse and describe works, becomes and necessary component in the dissemination and communication of the creative. The writing of the visual, explores the essence of communication and the positions and perspectives of artists and art writers. Art writing further provides primary sources to explore the changing role of the writing about art, from manifesto and critic to intention and reception.
This course will improve students’ individual research, critical analysis and written skills, in order to effectively express ideas for their own practice, and in interpreting and understanding the writings about art.

The course will examine fundamental skills of research practice, methods and methodology for practicing artists and academic writing on art. Revealing the relationship between art, creativity and language, as a methodology that can enhance communication and critical engagement with art theory and art historical writings. It will also assess writings on modern and contemporary visual arts practices by looking at how key texts from the past have informed present discourses on art.

We will examine a number of artists’ writings through selected examples of primary source materials; notes, correspondence, manifestos, and other printed matter, by those who work between art and also writing about art.

VART 3305 Further studies in Visual Arts Studies (Art History & Theory)

Course code: VART 3305
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by the course instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth, selected topics in contemporary issues related to the theoretical study of the Visual Arts. Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will look at issues from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will guide students to integrate various points of view and develop their own critical judgment of the Visual Arts.

The course will normally start with a discussion and introduction to the special topic in relation to the study and practice of the Visual Arts. Depending on the nature of the selected topic, the course will focus on one or more important trends of thought, assessing their relevance to contemporary culture and practice. Assigned readings will be interdisciplinary, and students will be encouraged to examine the topic from a cross-cultural perspective. The course will conclude with a critical reflection on the topic and its relevance to the general understanding of Visual Arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Visual Arts Studies Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3306 Further studies in Visual Arts Studies (Chinese Arts Studies)

Course code: VART 3306
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: To be specified by the course instructor
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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth, selected topics in contemporary issues related to the theoretical study of the Visual Arts. Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will look at issues from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will guide students to integrate various points of view and develop their own critical judgment of the Visual Arts.

The course will normally start with a discussion and introduction to the special topic in relation to the study and practice of the Visual Arts. Depending on the nature of the selected topic, the course will focus on one or more important trends of thought, assessing their relevance to contemporary culture and practice. Assigned readings will be interdisciplinary, and students will be encouraged to examine the topic from a cross-cultural perspective. The course will conclude with a critical reflection on the topic and its relevance to the general understanding of Visual Arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Visual Arts Studies Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3307 Further studies in Visual Arts Studies (Visual & Material Culture)

Course code: VART 3307
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: To be specified by the course instructor

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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth, selected topics in contemporary issues related to the theoretical study of the Visual Arts. Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will look at issues from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will guide students to integrate various points of view and develop their own critical judgment of the Visual Arts.

The course will normally start with a discussion and introduction to the special topic in relation to the study and practice of the Visual Arts. Depending on the nature of the selected topic, the course will focus on one or more important trends of thought, assessing their relevance to contemporary culture and practice. Assigned readings will be interdisciplinary, and students will be encouraged to examine the topic from a cross-cultural perspective. The course will conclude with a critical reflection on the topic and its relevance to the general understanding of Visual Arts.

This course changes subjects/theme regularly; therefore the individual instructor in consultation with the Visual Arts Studies Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3315 Concepts in Contemporary Art

Course code: VART 3315
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2305

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This course will concentrate on the study of contemporary developments in the visual arts by thematic discussion. The study will explore art and artists from across the world and examine the linking of concepts and theories of contemporary trends from 1960.

The complexities of the contemporary art ecology will be examined through social, political and economic frameworks to encourage students to actively consider and interpret how ideas, forms, materials, process and purpose all contribute to meaning.

In addition, this course will examine the contemporary phenomenon of art fairs, the rise of the economic interests in contemporary art and the homogenization of art in the contemporary context. Examining and theorizing ideas of meaning and identity, this course will explore contemporary art from differing perspectives, to build a picture of how contemporary art functions in the local and global artistic environment.

This course will build on the previous learning from the core courses Art and its Histories I & II and Art in the 20th Century I & II, which collectively will provide an encompassing visual art survey.

VART 3316 Critical Studies in Lens-based Media

Course code: VART 3316
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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Art historian Michael Fried in one of his recent book asks, ‘Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before’? (2008). Lens-based media have been an artistic fever and enjoy huge popularity amongst scholars, amateurs and professional artists since they were ‘invented’ in the 19th Century. With recent new development such as digital image revolution, analogue nostalgia, art activism and global image dissemination, the 21st Century seems set with the momentum to critically discuss, debate and theorise lens-based media.

To further Fried’s pressing question, it could be asked how 19th Century image science inspired and informed 20th Century artistic invention? And from there it may be explored in what ways lens-based media provide critical and alternative artistic strategies for social intervention and art activism in the 21st Century? What is the future of lens-based media if assessing it through a rear-view informed by media archaeology? Is Charlotte Cotton’s essay ‘The New Colour: The Return of Black-and-White’ (2007) adequate to address another revolution in image printing amongst young photographic artist in the 21st Century? These historical and critical narratives not only situate lens-based media at the centre of discussion but also instigating questions important enough to sensitise thinking also in other visual arts.

This theory course will examine the emergence and development of lens-based media since their invention. In addition to identifying and interpreting key milestones that underscore the development of lens-based media, student will also be directed and engaged in thematic discussion, analysis and debate of works of image scientists, photographers, video artists, and media artivists. Through contextualising historical narrative and introducing critical theory and discourse of lens-based media, student will be equipped with theoretical and analytical tools to research for lens-based media practice.

Key texts of lens-based media art historian and theorist will be brought into discussion to sharpen students’ critical and analytical ability in research and writing. Such critical discussion will generate debate, criticism and novel perspective in conceiving lens-based media practice beyond canonisation. This theory course not only allow students engaging in the currency and critical debates of theorising lens-based media in the 21st Century, but also through theorising, the course is able to enhance student’s intellectual sensitivity in shaping their own personal practices.

VART 3317 The Realities of Visual Culture

Course code: VART 3317
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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This course aims to extend students’ knowledge and experience beyond the study of their major by exploring the interaction between art, advertising and luxury goods, within the wider context of contemporary visual culture. This will then allow a reverse examination of the relations and influences of visual culture on the production of the contemporary visual arts, their markets and audiences.

The course will strongly emphasise on analytical and critical thinking to consider answers to questions like: How an age-old painting grasps our imagination? How a piece of sculpture may change the outlook of our city? Or: how much money should governments spend on culture?

Debates and questioning will critically engage with the development of visual culture and its association with the art market and luxury goods markets. This course assesses the contrasts and similarities, of the public and private sectors of art consumption and reflects upon aesthetic significance and monetary value of art. It also considers the changing notions of art and visual culture in terms of traditional associations of status, education and evaluates the roles of gallery, auction house, advertising and shopping mall as the centre pin of 'brands'. Further, reviewing the role of the public sector in the advancement of the art exhibition 'blockbuster' and the commercialization of art through case studies of world leading galleries such as Tate Modern, MOMA and the Guggenheim.

VART 3325 Chinese Literati Art: Identity, Transformation and Challenge

Course code: VART 3325
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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The Chinese literati artistic tradition plays a pivotal role in the development of Chinese painting and calligraphy, and their theories in Chinese culture. The literatis’ artistic taste is often characterized by an emphasis on the close relationship between calligraphy and painting, as expressed in inscriptions and poems on a painting, subject matters with self-referential or moral symbolism, and the plainness and simplicity of the imagery’s aesthetics.

Ever since the early attempts to define literati art by Su Shi and his circle in the 11th century, there has been a long-standing debate among critics and art historians regarding the art of the scholar-artists as an artistic tradition. The modern and contemporary Chinese artists have been confronted with the challenge posed by Western culture and new trends of thought.
Wrestling with their art during a prolonged period of social-political turmoil, they found themselves asking questions like “how to modernize or revolutionize Chinese art without forgoing the essence of the literati artistic tradition.”

This course investigates into the different discourses and theories on the Chinese literati art over time, interpreting the notions of identity and transformation and the challenges of the literati artistic tradition. Students will be guided to develop their self-chosen research topics in:

1. Calligraphy as Embodiment of Personality
2. Social identities and cultural ideals: discourses and artistic practice of the Northern Song literati circle
3. Landscape and subject matters with self-referential or moral symbolism
4. Approaches and aesthetics: self-amusement, sketching of ideas (xieyi 寫意) in ink play (moxi 墨戲), the aesthetics of calmness or blandness, naturalness or simplicity, awkwardness or antiqueness
5. The Theory of Northern and Southern Schools
6. Transformation and the challenges of the literati artistic tradition in the modern and contemporary world

With the instructor’s supervision in tutorials and group discussions, students will be able to acquire hands-on research skills and develop their own approach to scholarly research practice, which will enhance their ability to independently investigate artistic expressions and issues pertinent to Chinese literati art, and to synthesize new knowledge through application of appropriate theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches.

VART 3326 Hong Kong Arts

Course code: VART 3326
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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Every place has its own story/stories that can be narrated, illustrated and represented creatively through visual arts if not in words. This course attempts to tell the many stories of Hong Kong by looking at examples of local art works, including painting, sculpture, cartoons, photography and architecture that are produced from the early 19th century to the present day, as a way to outline the character and history of the place. With the supplement of texts and documentaries, students will learn from the visual examples how Hong Kong transformed from a small fishing village to a metropolis city of over seven million people; or from a British colony to be a part of the People Republic of China nowadays.

Alternately, the socio-political changes, technology development, education reform, cultural interaction of a place can also influence the production of works of art, in terms of style, medium and meaning. The search for identity before the return of sovereignty before 1997, for example, triggered off a substantial amount of art creation on the issue on Hong Kong identity.

The course will adopt a multi-disciplinary approach in reading stories of Hong Kong, not solely from the view points of visual arts, but also sociology, history, cultural studies, geography, and/or literature, whichever can bring new insight to enhance our understanding on the topics. The opportunity to study original works of art, either from museum or private collection, enables students to make direct encounter with the history of the place, which will ultimately inspire their thoughts and interpretation of the subject of Hong Kong.

VART 3327 HK Craft: Tradition and Transformation

Course code: VART 3327
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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Hong Kong is known for its concentration of traditional craftspeople and clusters of materials for handicraft industry. Nowadays, Hong Kong, as one of the post capital cities in Asia, faces urban re-development and the consequent potential loss of local marginalized wisdom of craftspeople and community networks. One of the Academy’s roles is to provide a platform to study traditional handicraft, conserve its culture and support its re-generation. By doing so, this course will inspire ideas and concepts also in subjects like Ceramics, Glass, Jewellery Design, sculpture, and Wearable.

This is a practice-based course with theory presenting the Hong Kong handicraft industry’s early development and handicraft skills. In exploring the relevant development in trend and ecological environment of traditional handicraft, its position within the framework of art-theory based cluster will also enhance the cognition of intangible cultural heritage and its sustainable conditions under the material culture concerns and cultural policy-making.

The course will experience sharing of and collaboration with local traditional craftspeople. It emphasizes both technique training and materials exploration, including the handling and interpreting of traditional or new materials and how to convert them into a new form of art and design. Student will be encouraged to interact with each other and the local community for their creative projects. Handicraft such as paper offerings for ancestors, paper scissor-cuts, Cantonese embroidery, Chinese bird cage, paper lantern, flour-clay character, rattan knitting, galvanized iron manufacture, cart and wooden boat building etc. will be studied in this course.

VART 3335 Museum Studies

Course code: VART 3335
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Introduction to Western Art AND VART 2306 Introduction to Chinese Art OR VART2335 Material Culture & Collections OR VART 2336 Exhibition and Art Markets
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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Museums have served many functions, as educational institutions, repositories of artifacts , temples of genuine artworks, and as social agents promoting civic values. How do museums balance their diverse roles and responsibilities against a backdrop of changing social agendas, commercial competition,  globalization, and the desires of the public ?

This course examines the history and changing mission of museums. Fundamental aspects of museum culture  including organizational conventions, collection management policies, documentation systems, interpretation and communication mechanisms, and education and outreach programmes will be introduced.. Through case studies, hands-on workshops, and site visits, this course offers students practical knowledge of art administration with an emphasis on operation routines, management skills, and project planning, to bring art to a wider audience. This course also examines how museums can convey standards about the value and meaning of works of art, shape public understanding of art, and become involved in the production of art and culture Students will learn about operating mechanisms of museums and reflect on the complex relationship between museums and contemporary practices in the art world and in society.

Looking into various museum practices, such as the acquisition, preservation and displaying of works of art, this course explores how meanings of art are shaped and thus enables students to reflect on their artistic practices. This helps bridging with many practical courses offered by the AVA.

VART 3337 The Anthropology of Art

Course code: VART 3337
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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This course introduces the study of visual anthropology, examining the visual documentation of humanity and its cultures. Exploring a variety of media objects and events, this course critically engages students into debates and issues related to photography, advertising, global mass media, material culture and the impact of new technologies.

The visual interpretation offers significant insight into our understanding of the human development in terms of our own identities, and within the wider global and historical contexts. Fragile, and often temporarily specific, the analyses of visual elements offer an intellectual platform for contextualization and decontextualization.

Exploring concepts and methods as research tools for anthropological inquiry that consider the inter-connection of reality, social perspectives, and the resulting visuality, which can help to inform and influence our ways of understanding and assimilating our lives and societies.

Through the discussions of what images mean to us, and their effects, the course will further poses crucial questions surrounding our understanding within the historical, cultural and social, value and power of vision, image and artefact. Emphasizing and contextualizing the relations between people and the visual as objects, studied both within and external to, environmental and cultural context, this course will guide students to integrate various points of view and develop their own critical judgment of the Visual Arts.

VART 3336 Material Culture & Collections

Course code: VART 3336
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century II
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2306

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Materials are significant elements in our understanding of culture both in terms of our own identities and within the wider global contexts. This course will explore concepts and theories of material culture in reflecting upon the elements of culture, which surround and influence our daily lives. Examining the everyday context of material life through a variety of methods and theories, students will develop their skills of textual and visual analysis and be equipped with theoretical frameworks in examining objects within wider context of culture.

From objects of personal significance to national treasure, and from consumer good circulated in global markets to connoisseur’s curios, the analysis of material culture seeks to question meaning, value and intention. Through the discussions of what objects mean to us, the course will further pose crucial questions evaluating the historical, cultural and social significance of objects. Contextualising the entangled relationship between people and material objects, and studying things both within and external to, environmental and cultural contexts, this course will engage students into critical debates of material culture, and broaden their understanding of creating and creativity in contemporary society.

Drawing theories from Art History, Museology, and Anthropology, this course will include critical analysis of objects in a variety of forms and mediums, such as painting, textile, buildings, and heritage sites. Based within themes of context, the course will analyse issues of consumption, globalization, tourism, gender, tradition, value, belief, commerce and historical events. This course connects laterally across the disciplines of the AVA providing the theoretical context for practice and creativity.

VART 3366 Further Studies in Craft and Design (Experience Design)

Course code: VART 3366
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: To be specified by the course instructor, including at least one level 2000 course from the same cluster
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This course aims to provide an opportunity for students to study in-depth selected topics in contemporary issues related to the various creative practices in Craft & Design.

Through examination of theories related to the topic, students will get an initial look at issues in the Craft & Design from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. The course will then guide them to integrate various points of view, and to develop their own critical judgment on the topic under study.

Starting on the basis of this initial introduction the course will then aim to investigate through practice different approaches and methodologies to the course topic, and to ultimately connect and integrate them with existing skills and knowledge of course participants. The aim is to develop and practice skills and concepts for students’ personal practices in Craft & Design at the current state of the arts.

This  course  changes  subjects/theme  regularly;  therefore  the  individual  instructor  in consultation with the Craft & Design Division will determine the selected topic, to take full advantage of developing research, issues and global developments in the visual arts.

VART 3367 Exhibition and Art Markets

Course code: VART 3367
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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How is art effected and affected by exhibition cultures and art markets?

Do exhibitions define art buying patterns? Or do buying patterns define exhibitions?

These are key questions for the understanding of the art world, and need to be of core interest to the emerging artist breaking into the highly competitive art market place.

From the differing perspectives of both the public and the private sector, this course will provide navigation support and assessment of the contrasts and similarities of the sectors, discussing issues of wealth and value, consumption, and ownership.

To do so the course will extend the students knowledge of the history and theory of exhibitions, collecting, and the effect and impacts of the growing commercial art markets. It will further analyse the roles and restrictions of cultural policy and definitions of culture, in a local and global sense, and contextualise these frameworks for public and private sectors. Case studies of world leading galleries such as Tate Modern, MOMA and the Guggenheim will be studied to determine the meaning of ’blockbuster exhibitions’ and the commercialisation of art as is evident through the marketing practice of exhibitions and their associated gift shop memorabilia.

The changing role of art and its exhibition will be examined, in terms of traditional associations of status, education and of art in an increasing commercial form as investment. Assessing the roles of gallery, dealer, auction house and buyer as the centre pin to driving and responding to market forces. These themes and topics will provide essential knowledge of the arts sector, reviewing the role of the public and private sectors in the advancement of the art exhibition.

VART 3375 Arts of Asia

Course code: VART 3375
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2305

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The fundamental aim of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of Asian art in the 20th century. It will explore the range of arts from Painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, modern and contemporary art. The course will look at  art produced in  China, Japan, Korea, India, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia, questioning the differences and individuality of the creative product.

The course will further question ideas of national identity in modern and contemporary art and will be used to illustrate the diversity and uniqueness of visual art and culture in these countries.

We will examine the cultural interaction through which the production, trading and consumption of art and the course will actively encourage students to investigate the individual characteristics of visual arts of different countries and cultures , it attempts to enhance student’s understanding of the visual arts in the scope of Asia.

To understand any culture it is necessary to study the arts from that culture and how they interrelate with historical, geographical, religious and philosophical factors. The Arts of Asia make tangible and visible the beliefs, which have guided the various civilizations of the continent

VART 3376 Art, Culture and Criticism

Course code: VART 3376
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 2305

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Art criticism is an essential element of artistic practice and has a multitude of uses from artist’s statements to exhibition, critical analysis and academic discourse. How the artist uses words to analyse and describe works, becomes a necessary component in the dissemination and communication of the creative.

This course will use the practice of viewing exhibitions with a focus on Hong Kong and Chinese artists to provide practical skills of visual analysis to improve students’ individual critical analysis and research. In addition this course will visually explore the essence of communication, and the positions and perspectives of artists and art writers. It further provides primary sources to explore the changing role of the writing about art, from manifesto and critic to intention and reception.

Art, Culture and Criticism reveals the relationship between art, creativity and language, as a methodology that can enhance communication and critical engagement with art theory and art historical writings. It will also assess writings on modern and contemporary visual arts practices by looking at how key texts from the past have informed present discourses on art. The course thus examines fundamental skills of research practice, methods and methodology for practicing artists and academics in writing on art.

We will visit a number of exhibitions and critically examine the work in comparison with artists’ writings through selected examples of current exhibitions in Hong Kong, utilizing – where possible – primary source materials like notes, correspondence, manifestos, and other printed matter.

VART 1305 Art and its Histories I

Course code: VART 1305
3 Units

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The aim of this course is to introduce students to the key developments in the history of visual art. This theme-based course will survey the production of art within the context of the social, cultural, and stylistic significances of art under changing historical, scientific and philosophical conditions.

Each theme will be examined, in depth and linked with theory to form a comprehensive analytical survey of the canon of Art History from a global perspective and present connections with the everyday lives of the students. The in-depth analysis of specific works of visual art will broaden the knowledge of creativity and explore issues of multi-cultural creation, belief, ideology and reception.

By studying and understanding the developments and importance of art and culture, students can inform their own practice and compete as artists in a global setting with a greater clarity and depth of knowledge. The courses combine to synthesise understanding of visual art from a global perspective.

This course will be delivered in blocks of learning with assessment at the end of each block.

VART 1306 Art and Its Histories II

Course code: VART 1306
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art and Its Histories I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART 1305

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This is the second part of the Art and its Histories-course, continuing the introduction of key developments in the history of visual art. This theme-based course will survey the production of art within the context of the social, cultural, and stylistic significances of art under changing historical, scientific and philosophical conditions.

Each theme will be examined, in depth and linked with theory to form a comprehensive analytical survey of the canon of Art History from a global perspective and present connections with the everyday lives of the students. The in-depth analysis of specific works of visual art will broaden the knowledge of creativity and explore issues of multi-cultural creation, belief, ideology and reception.

By studying and understanding the developments and importance of art and culture, students can inform their own practice and compete as artists in a global setting with a greater clarity and depth of knowledge. The courses combine to synthesise understanding of visual art from a global perspective.

This course will be delivered in blocks of learning with assessment at the end of each block.

VART 2305 Art in the 20th Century I

Course code: VART2305
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art and Its Histories II
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART1306

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As visual artists, how we think, and how we understand the world around us, both affects and influences our creativity and the works we create. The art of the 20th century exemplifies this interplay between art, artist and society, marking a point of distinct artistic difference with the past and highlighting Modernity throughout culture and society. The responses to Modernity have incorporated new forms and expressions of visual art and developed a range of radical theories, attempting to define and contextualise the visual arts in a century of unprecedented global change.

Using the themes of Modernity as a platform – for example: revolution, gender, industrial advance etc. – we will examine the shaping of visual art of the 20th century. Considering the relationships and affinities between varieties of media, and investigating the theories and language of visual art, we will learn to understand contextually and visually the often ambiguous terms of ‘Modern’, ‘Modernity’ and ‘Modernism’.

This is a year course intended to offer the student a greater depth of understanding of issues, approaches and methodologies of art history and the interplay between visual art, the creative process and the influence of the political, cultural, economic and anthropological arenas of life.

VART 2306 Art in the 20th Century II

Course code: VART2306
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Art in the 20th Century I
Pre-requisite Course Code: VART2305

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As visual artists, how we think, and how we understand the world around us, both affects and influences our creativity and the works we create. The art of the 20th century exemplifies this interplay between art, artist and society, marking a point of distinct artistic difference with the past and highlighting Modernity throughout culture and society. The responses to Modernity have incorporated new forms and expressions of visual art and developed a range of radical theories, attempting to define and contextualise the visual arts in a century of unprecedented global change.

Using the themes of Modernity as a platform – for example: revolution, gender, industrial advance etc. – we will examine the shaping of visual art of the 20th century. Considering the relationships and affinities between varieties of media, and investigating the theories and language of visual art, we will learn to understand contextually and visually the often ambiguous terms of ‘Modern’, ‘Modernity’ and ‘Modernism’.

This is a year course intended to offer the student a greater depth of understanding of issues, approaches and methodologies of art history and the interplay between visual art, the creative process and the influence of the political, cultural, economic and anthropological arenas of life.

 

Hong Kong visual arts students should have an appreciation of Chinese cultural heritage and the recent developments of Chinese visual arts, not only to enrich their own artistic production, but also to intellectually challenge them to organize knowledge gained from the course and to use their analytical skill to explain Chinese visual arts in the conditions
that produced them.

The course presents Chinese art as expression of material culture, belief systems, politics, elitist emblem, self-cultivation, identity, community and changing worldviews. Structuring in a chronological and thematic manner, this course begins with Late Neolithic material cultures and ends with contemporary artistic expressions. The broad survey provides students with knowledge and understanding of the cultural, social, and stylistic significances of Chinese visual arts under changing historical conditions.

VART 1005 Visual Arts Practice I

Course code: VART 1005
3 Units

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‘Visual Arts Practice I’ & ‘Visual Arts Practice II’ are required double-courses to be offered in consecutive semesters of Year 1 of the BA (Hons) In Visual Arts-programme of AVA. The course will be offered in parallel with the theory courses ‘Art and its Histories I’ & ‘Art and its Histories II’, and are intended to supplement and expand their learning by introducing fundamental practical knowledge, skills and work attitude to first-year students to train up their ‘minds’, ‘eyes’ and ‘hands’ for further study in various academic / artistic clusters within the BA-programme, and to familiarize them with the settings of teaching and learning at the Academy of Visual Arts.

‘Visual Arts Practice I’ focuses on initially introducing students to a selected set of practical 2D and 3D skills that enable them to start off their personal creative production, and develop a sense for a sustainable personal studio practice.

VART 1006 Visual Arts Practice II

Course code: VART1006
3 Units

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‘Visual Arts Practice I’ & ‘Visual Arts Practice II’ are required double-courses to be offered in consecutive semesters of Year 1 of the BA (Hons) In Visual Arts-programme of AVA. The course will be offered in parallel with the theory courses ‘Art and its Histories I’ & ‘Art and its Histories II’, and are intended to supplement and expand their learning by introducing fundamental practical knowledge, skills and work attitude to first-year students to train up their ‘minds’, ‘eyes’ and ‘hands’ for further study in various academic / artistic clusters within the BA-programme, and to familiarize them with the settings of teaching and learning at the Academy of Visual Arts.

‘Visual Arts Practice II’ focuses on heightening students’ aesthetical and cultural awareness as well as facilitating the development of their perceptual and conceptual abilities for visual arts practice. Through a series of integrated seminars, workshops and field studies, students are expected to formulate critical feedback; to articulate creative ideas and to propose individual creative responses in connection to a specified topic. From sensory observations to idea development, then to visualizing innovative thoughts, students will go through the comprehensive process of creative thinking and execute their creative ideas with appropriate media and problem solving skills.

VART 3005-7 Visual Arts Internship

Course code: VART 3005-7
3 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: N/A
Pre-requisite Course Code: Completion of minimum four Visual Arts level 2 courses

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All students of the BA (Hons) in Visual Arts-programme are recommended to undertake an internship within their preferred career area during their time of study. An internship links class room theory to professional practice, and thus will provide the student with learning experiences beyond the possibilities of the BA (Hons)-programme. Such experience will be valuable for the student’s professional and personal development, and in particular very helpful in establishing and/or verifying the student’s career intentions.

As any internship is not supposed to interfere with the regular studies of the student, it will usually by taken as a summer course during term-break.

Any internship will be self-organized by the student, in an institutional body related to the cultural and/or creative sector. To be eligible for credit-units the internship needs to represent a workload equivalent to 156 regular working hours to be taken as one consecutive employment. The nature of work performed by the intern during the internship should reflect a reasonable professional level in design, visual arts, arts administration or equivalent.

If a student intends to claim credit-units for an internship, he has to seek approval through the Internship Coordinator prior to up-taking the position. In order to get approval the student needs to provide sufficient information about the internship provider – including the name and contact data of a specified supervisor from within the internship institution – as well as about the intended nature of work during the internship.

Upon returning to his studies the student is obliged to provide exhaustive documentation of his doings during the internship, and a written report from the internship supervisor to the Internship Coordinator. The Internship Coordinator will assess the sufficient validity of the tasks performed during the internship, and declare – usually after consultation with other academic staff – the relevancy of the internship for one particular concentration. Any internship will only be graded as ‘pass/fail’, and will be listed in the student’s Transcript of Records.

VART 4015 Research and Practice in Visual Arts

Course code: VART 4015
6 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Completion of min. one BA-cluster
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This is one of two independent study courses for Year 4-students of the BA (Hons) in Visual Arts-programme to choose. Like its equivalent it has a focus on interdisciplinary research in the visual arts, which is integrated with a self-generated practical creative team project based on the course’s discipline framework for Studio and Media Arts. While there are no principal formal restrictions to the creative project – it may be of any medium or approach – students have to initiate, develop and execute the practical project collaboratively, and need to commit to substantial research work as part of their outcome.

To provide the students with access to the thematic context of the course a sequence of lectures, case studies, tutorials and other relevant teaching and learning activities relating to research and practice in the Studio and Media Arts will be offered. These activities also establish a time and workload structure to give guidance to the students, and provide opportunity for feedback and criticism.

In addition to the specified discipline framework both independent study-courses share a series of workshops that aim at consolidating, combining and extending the wide range of cross-disciplined research methods, cross-media creative approaches as well as work documentation and presentation skills that students of the programme have acquired in their previous studies so far. Participation in these workshops will help the students to independently pursue their investigations and experimentations within their personal projects in this course.

The knowledge, skills and experiences that students gained in this course will equip them for the development of individual Honours Project in the final stage of study in the programme.

VART 4055 Honours Project

Course code: VART 4055
6 Units

Pre-requisite Course Name: Year III standing
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The Honours Project provides a keystone experience for the student in his final year in the BA (Hons) in Visual Arts-programme. It gives the student an opportunity to prove his capability of solving independently and self-reliantly a self-generated assignment in the work-field of the Visual Arts. He will apply the concepts and skills gained on the programme to the investigation. In successfully doing so the student will meet academic and creative standards that allow the Academy to confer the BA (Hons) in Visual Arts Degree on him.

The Honours Project has to be completed by all students during their final term of study in the BA (Hons) Visual Arts-programme. To increase students’ performance during the development of their Honours Project, and as preparation for their careers after graduation the Honours Project includes a series of required workshops.

Studio & Media Arts

Studio & Media Arts allows the student to focus his endeavours in traditional studio arts and/or contemporary media arts, aiming to generate meaning through aesthetic and/or intellectual concepts, beyond a merely functional approach. It indicates the student’s ability to work in areas related to the fine arts – as a practicing artist –, to teach related areas or take on some administrative positions from the area.

Craft & Design

Craft and design both have the physical work-result at the centre of their disciplines. Be it a hand-made artefact or a mass-produced industry product, the essence of the result is in its physicality. Because of this, concepts of functionality, usability, sustainability, but also consideration of production processes, market-demand and/or general benefits play an increasingly important role to the visual artist. Completion of this concentration indicates the student’s ability to work as designer or artisan, to teach in this area, and/or to take on administrative positions related to the area.

Visual Arts Studies*

A concentration in Visual Arts Studies offers the student a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the visual arts with a focus on the notion of public experience and education in and about the visual arts through new creative strategies. A student completing this concentration will strive to work in arts administration for governmental and non-governmental organisations, to write about visual arts as a journalist or critic, or to attempt a career in art direction or curation.

Interdisciplinary

Our many factual distinctions within the educational landscape of Hong Kong – like practice-based education, unique course-offerings, extensive studiospaces, etc. – are tied together by the Academy’s strong commitment to the ideal of interdisicplinarity, the philosophy of bringing together the various formats,media, approaches, concepts, and methodologies of all visual arts that are otherwise scattered in various separate areas, subjects and/or disciplines in just as many departments and/or universities.

* For students under 2012 & 2013 Intakes only